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Karr's (Alphonso) Lover to his
Mistress, translated

219
Krummacher's Relics of Elijah
the Tishbite

.... 115
Krummacher's Jacob Wrestling
with the Angel

116

L.

Gambler, the, selected from the

Records of the Eccentric Club 424
Genius, the Pleasures of, a Poem,
by John A. Heraud. Part I. 37

Part II. . 160

Part III. 247
Globe-Maker, the, a Reverie.... 243
Gobie, the

200
Godwin (Geo., Jun., F.S.A.) his

Churches of London 113, 206
Godwin (Mrs.) her Two Voices 402

her Reconciliation 569
Göthe's Faust, the Second Part

of, translated by Leopold J.
Bernays .. 93, 129, 293, 413, 534,

645
Green-Room...

92, 218, 447
Greeting, Our New Year's
Grisenthwaite on Food ... 351
Guarantees of the English Con-
stitution, by Dr. Michelson .. 404,

506
Gutzlaff's (Chas.) Three Voyages

round the Coast of China in
1831, 1832, and 1833

468

H.

594

Hastings, Lady Flora..........
Heraud (John A.) — The Plea-

Lamartine and Novalis .... 56, 435
Latham (R. G.), his Translation
of E. Tegner's Axel

87
Laurel and the Rose

621
Lavater's Original Maxims for
the Young

115
Law

113
Legal Fictions, by N. T. Moile . 197
Legal Guide, the ......

113
Library Colloquies. .79, 227,448
Monologue

662
Light, the Undulatory Theory of,
by Charles Toogood Downing

219, 256, 564, 675
Literature, 215, Spanish

473
Little Derwent's Breakfast..... 670
Lockhart, J. G., bis Vindication
of Sir Walter Scott.....

576
Lover, the, to his Mistress, from

the French of Alphonse Karr.. 219
Loyal Suggestions, humbly sub-

mitted to the Queen's Most

sures of Genius, a Poem, by
him, Part I...

Part II.
Part III.

37
160
247

Excellent Majesty, by an Æs-
thetic Student in Morals..... 569

Philosophical Study, by Theodore
Jouffroy..

206
Piromides, the, a tragedy

458
Pleasures of Genius, the, a poem,
by John A. Heraud, Part I.. 37

II.. 160

III.. 247
Poet, the Nameless

228
Poetry, Remarks on

5
Politics, Remarks on

10, 214
Pollock, Sir F....

113
Port Natal

634
Portraiture...

113
Pritchard, Andrew, his Micros-

copic Illustrations of Living
Objects.

110
Prothanasia, by Mr. Thomas
Wade ...

.. 662

M.
Manners, Customs, and Charac-
ter of the Zoolus ...

304
Mansel's, H. L, Mind's Elysium 272

Sonnets...... 702
Marston, J. W., on Poetry 81

on Poetic Cul-
ture.

461
Maxims for Mothers..

632
McHenry's, James, M.D., Ante-
diluvians.

356
M'Caul, the Rey. Alex. D.D.,

Sketches of Judaism and the
Jews .....

... 116
Mead, Henry, on Shakspere.... 231
Mechanic Invention, the Soniferon 112
Menechilda, the Idiot of Madrid
Milton, Papers on, Part I...... 117

II. 361

III...... 595
Miller's, Thos., Rural Sketches 665
Moile's, Nicholas Thirning, Spe.
cimen of a new edition of
State Trials ....

197
Mr. George Stevens, being No.V.

second series, of the Remem-

brances of a Monthly Nurse.. 516
Mr. Morton Moncton, being No.

III, second series, of the Re.
membrances of a Monthly
Nurse.....

272
Muston's Outlines of celebrated

Works from the best Masters 113

48

Q.
Quizfizz's Heads of the People

113, 206

R.

Reade, John Edmund, his Deluge,
a drama

[blocks in formation]

356
Reconciliation, by Mrs. Godwin 569
Remembrances of a Monthly

Nurse, second series
No. 1. Isabel Deane...

14
2. The Marchioness L-d

and Lady Jane Ur-
quhart

171
3. Mr. Morton Moncton 272
4. The Countess of L- 383

5. Mr. George Stevens .. 516
Retrospect of Spanish Literature,

by Professor Carlo Pepoli.... 473
Richelieu, reviewed

448
Rooke's Henrique, reviewed.... 684
Ryall's Portraits of eminent Con-

servatives and Statesmen 113

S.
Scarlet Fathers

114
Science...

....110, 214
Scott, Sir Walter, Genius and
Wisdom of

217
Vindication of, by Mr. Lock-
hart ....

576
Scott's Soniferon

113
Scott's, W. B., Hades, or the
Transit.

356
Shee, Sir Martin Archer, 84, 227,630
Shelley's Works

,356, 457
Sonnet, Envy...

242
Sonnets, by H. L. Mansel, Esq. 702

Page
State Trials, Specimens of, by Ni-

cholas Thining Moile .. 197
Stokes, J., complete Cabinet-ma-
ker

356
Stephens, George, Voice of the
Pulpit...

356
Stothard, Robert T., F.S.A. elect,

H.D.S.A., Letter to George
Birkbeck, Esq., M.D., presi-
dent, &c., on the Arts, forming

a basis of national education 461
Strauss on Restitution

116
Styles's, Dr., Prize Essay on
Animal Creation ...

577
Syncretism in Church and State 147

347

Page
The Marchioness L-d and Lady

Jane Urquhart, being No. 11.
of ditto...

171
Translations

115
Tracts for the Tiines, impartially

and dispassionately considered 315
Trials of the Heart.

467
Two Voices, the....

402

V.
Venables', Rev. R. Lester, Do-

mestic Scenes in Russia..... 469
Vestris, Madame, and Shakspere,

in relation to time and space.. 218
Vilage Clerk and the Widow, a

right-humorous and merrily-
conceited tale...

486
Village Magazine

206
Vital Principle, discovery of.... 464

T.
Table-Talk, or the Hebrew Claims 376
Talfourd's, Serjeant, Copyright
Bill..

583
Tegner, Esaias, his Axel, a poem 87
The Countess of L- being

No. IV. of the second series
of the Remembrances of a
Monthly Nurse.

383

W.
Wade, Mr. Thomas, in Protha.
nasia

662

z.

Zoolus, the

70, 304, 634

THE

MONTHLY

MAGAZINE.

New Series.-EDITED BY JOHN A. HERAUD, Esq.

Vol. I.]

JANUARY, 1839.

[No. 1.

OUR NEW YEAR'S GREETING.

DEAR READERS OF THE OLD FAMILIAR” MonthlyMay the New Year be happy, as, doubtless, the Christmas has been merry! We say doubtless, as by way of surmise, because we knew you not then; and, indeed, our relation with you even now begins. More than once, however, we have discovered, that we have been well known where we have been all-unknowing ;-no stranger to them who have been strangers to us. Most authors, however limited their fame, must have experienced this professional peculiarity; and it is, therefore, not without some degree of confidence in the belief that we may be received as an old friend or acquaintance, that we venture into your society-addressing you not too familiarly, yet without diffidence.

The proprietors of this Magazine have already appealed to you in terms so laudatory to our pretensions, and so full of expectation from our efforts, that whatever our sang froid, we cannot help feeling the burthen of the responsibility with which we are invested by their good opinion and better promises. It becomes us to assume our new office with modesty, nevertheless with courage, and that resolve which, we are told by a poet admired in our youth, but somewhat too much neglected now-a-days, is the “column of true majesty in man." Noble determinations precede noble actions, as the gorgeous sunset foretells a glorious morrow.

Every deed performed by man has reference to a proposition already conceived and executed in the mind. There has already risen and set a prior state, itself connected with an ever-during intelligence, which is not us, but in us—as the light that lighteth every man that cometh into the world. Nay, we ourselves, as the purposers of excellent designs, are but, as it were, propositionsaxioms divinely uttered-echoes of the one word—diverse forms of one eternal affirmation. What wonder, then, that our own propositions should be but results-derivations from previous performances -and be related, as well to what goes before as to what comes after? Even so, if, in giving an Example of what a Magazine should be, we seek to erect a standard for this species of literature in futuró, we are not without obligations to the specimens in this kind that have preceded.

N. 8.-VOL. 1.

B

The original Proposition, or Idea, of a Magazine, was very humble and limited in its scheme and scope. It was an infant desire, not yet cradled ; for it was born without means; and, in fact, was a premature anticipation of manly vigour scarcely to be expected from such an unripe birth. The publications of this class that we now have differ more from the Negotiator's Magazine, and other productions under similar titles, than the man does from the child. Works so denominated, in the beginning, were not even periodical, nor became so, until the eighteenth century, when Cave, the celebrated printer, started the Gentleman's Magazine ; which, however, was indebted to Dr. Johnson for its ultimate prosperity. At best but a compilation, with serious “ defects in its poetical article,” and no less sad deficiences in all its other departments-mainly supported by“ low jests, awkward buffoonery, or the dull scurrility of either party;"- Dr. Johnson introduced into it learning and argumentation, devoting thereto the best years of his life as a mere literary labourer (says Boswell) “ for gain, not glory,” and solely to obtain an honest livelihood. To him are due, in a great measure, the parliamentary debates, jeux d'esprit, and prefaces, for which, during many lustres, the work was celebrated.

It was, however, principally to the parliamentary reports, the eloquence of debate in which proceeded altogether from Dr. Johnson's own mind, that the success of the Gentleman's Magazine was owing ; Cave, meanwhile (poor mechanical dreamer !) flattering himself that it was due to those parts of the work which he conducted, and which were, it seems, merely the abridgment of weekly papers written against the ministry of the day, such as the Craftsman, Fogg's Journal, Common Sense, the Weekly Miscellany, the Westminster Journal, and others; besides the marshalling of the pastorals, the elegies and the songs, the epigrams and the rebuses, that were sent him by various correspondents. So blind is the mere tradesman to the merit of the literary ware by which he lives! He prospers, not because of his skill, but in spite of his mistakes.

Among all the Magazines, however, that have, at different periods, had their day, or, at the present time, continne to flourish, not one appears to have been projected with a higher purpose than that of ephemeral existence. Intended for popular perusal only, their proprietors and editors seem never to have conceived the intention of fitting them for a permanent place in the library of a scholar or a gentleman. Such periodicals as now exist, indeed, are addressed mainly, if not absolutely, to narrow prejudices, prevalent errors, and party feelings. Vain is it to expect from them either faithful criticism, or truly liberal speculation, in the fruitful and ever expanding fields of Philosophy, Politics, or Religion.

We write from a pretty extensive knowledge of the subject, and know of no worse evil under the sun than what the editors of these publications suffer, by reason of the contracted views of proprietors and publishers. What we have above stated of Cave, on the authority of Dr. Johnson himself, is true of his successors to the present day. The ideal of a publisher is a man who is the negation of all principle, and, therefore, indifferent to the opinions pro

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