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Days of the mmooth

Times of observation

Place

Wind Weather 10 V. P.M. 78 Donegala, a small town in Penn

Fair.
sylvania
11 VII. A.M.74 Washington, in

XII. M. 84 Washington
V. P.M. 82 County, Penn-

sylvania. 12 VII. A.M.72 lame place.

Fair.
XII. M. 84
V. P.M. 83

Thundershower in the

evening. " At this place I was so unfortunate as to break my Thermometer.- HARRIS.

} Brownsville.“

}

[84] METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS

MADE AT GRENVILLE COLLEGE IN THE STATE OF TENNESSEE

By WILLIAM CHANDLER, A.M. one of the Tutors

Times of observation

20

Times of observation

Mean

March, 1803

Observations

The greatest degree of cold was on the Thermometer

2d in the morning: the greatest degree of Highest Lowest Mean heat on the 26th P.M. Prevalent winds Morning. 65 63 44 from S. to W. A very little snow on the Noon. 73

58 9th. From the ift to 7th fair; on the 7th P.M. 75

63 and 8th much rain, and some thunder; Barometer

on the 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, and 27th A.M. 28,80/28,14/28,50 rain, much wind, and thunder. The reM. 28,82 28,1828,56 maining days sunshine and pleasant. P.M. 28,78128,33 28,55

Peach trees in bloom the latter end of

this month. April

The greatest degree of cold was on the Thermometerje 17th; the greatest degree of heat was on

the 29th. Prevalent winds from S. to Highest Lowest

N.W. Rain on the 4th, 15th, 20th, 22d, A.M.

70 32 55 23d, and 25th. The atmosphere was M. 78 50 69

very smoky a considerable part of the P.M. 82

54

70 remaining days. On the 17th, 18th, Barometer

and 19th were frosts which destroyed A.M. 28,79 28,21 28,57 the young fruit, and the principal part

M. 28,79 28,21 28,58 of the mast.
P.M. 28,79 28,43 28,57 Not much thunder this month.

May
Thermometer

The greatest degree of heat was on the

17th; the least on the 9th, when there A.M. 70 44

61

was frost. Rain on the ist, 4th, 5th, 6th, M. 82 58

73 7th, 17th, 18th, 20th, 22d, 24th, 25th, P.M.

86
60

75 and 26th; the other days were fair; but
Barometer few of them smoky.
A.M. 28,90 28,26|28,52 Not much thunder this month.
M.

28,9128,26 28,52 P.M. 28,89|28,27/28,54

Times of observation

Highest Lowest

Mean

Times of observation

June

Observations
Thermometer

Greatest degree of heat on the 17th Highest Lowest Mean and 27th, least on the 6th. Rain on the A.M. 76 61 69 4th, 5th, 12th, 15th, 16th, 18th, and 19th.

M. 83 78 The remainder of the month pleasant.
P.M. 87 72 83 No days smoky.
Barometer

The meazles have prevailed this, and A.M. (28,80 28,33|28,54

the preceding months, with greater M.

28,81 28,3228,56 severity than had been known before. P.M. 28,77/28,29/28,54

In many instances they proved fatal.
[85] July

Thermometer The greatest degree of heat was on the
Highest Lowest

12th and 13th; the least on the 6th and

7th. The thermometer has stood at go A.M. 77

64 71

two or three times at between III. and M.

79 IV. P.M.

We had rain on the ad, 4th, P.M. 89

75

73 16th, 17th, and 24th. Barometer

For the two last months the prevalent A.M. 28,79 28,39/28,58/winds were from S.W. to W. We have

M. 28,80 28,35 28,59 very few winds from the east. Storms P.M. 28,78 28,34 28,57 are heard to roar in the mountains,fif

Note. The time of P.M. teen miles south of this place, for one or observation is a little past the more days before they come. greatest heat of the day.

Times of observation

Mean

72

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