History of Ohio: The Rise and Progress of an American State, Band 2

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Seite 576 - The voluntary outpouring of the public feeling, made to-day, from the North to the South, and from the East to the West, proves this sentiment to be both just and natural.
Seite 486 - Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds : pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew : fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers ; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild...
Seite 126 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace; but do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Seite 603 - The general boundary line between the lands of the United States, and the lands of the said Indian tribes, shall begin at the mouth of the Cuyahoga river, and run thence up the same to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of the Muskingum; thence down that branch to the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; thence...
Seite 580 - I had a strict eye to them, and will add but orte word, — beware of a surprise! I repeat it, beware of a surprise ; you know how the Indians fight us! He went off with that as my last solemn warning thrown into his ears. And yet to suffer that army to be cut to pieces, hacked, butchered, tomahawked, by a surprise, — the very thing I guarded him against ! O God ! O God ! he's worse than a murderer! How can he answer it to his country? The blood of the slain is upon him, — the curse of the widows...
Seite 459 - It is hereby ordained and declared, by the authority aforesaid That the following articles shall be considered as articles of compact between the original states, and the people and states, in the said territory, and forever remain unalterable, unless by common consent, to wit: ARTICLE I.
Seite 125 - I may challenge the whole orations of Demosthenes and Cicero, and of any more eminent orator, if Europe has furnished more eminent, to produce a single passage, superior to the speech of Logan, a Mingo chief, to Lord Dunmore, when governor of this state.
Seite 126 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, 'Logan is the friend of white men.
Seite 114 - When he arose, he was in no wise confused or daunted, but spoke in a distinct and audible voice, without stammering or repetition, and with peculiar emphasis. His looks, while addressing Dunmore, were truly grand and majestic; yet graceful and attractive. I have heard the first orators in Virginia, — Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, — but never have I heard one whose powers of delivery surpassed those of Cornstalk.
Seite 143 - That the inhabitants of the English colonies in North America, by the immutable laws of nature, the principles of the English Constitution, and the several charters or compacts, have the following rights: Resolved, NCD 1.

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