The Floricultural Cabinet, and Florists Magazine, Band 4

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Joseph Harrison
Whitaker & Company, 1836
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Seite 87 - Shrubs, &c. adapted to the Flower Garden, Shrubbery, and Greenhouse ; with Select Lists of the finest Roses, Geraniums, Carnations, Pinks, Auriculas, Polyanthuses, Tulips, Dahlias, Heartsease, Cistus or Rock Rose, &c. To which is added the Monthly operation usual for the Flower Garden, Shrubbery, and Greenhouse.
Seite 118 - Carnation, as well as the formation of the flower, which should not be less than two inches and a half in diameter ; the petals should be large, broad, and substantial, and have very...
Seite 118 - ... tinge or spot : the eye should consist of a bright or dark rich crimson, or purple, resembling velvet ; but the nearer it approaches to black, the more it is esteemed : its proportion should be about equal to that of the white, that it may neither appear too large nor too small.
Seite 4 - Parasitical plants ,- that is to say, such as are either destitute of the power of pumping up their nourishment from the soil, or of elaborating it completely; or as cannot exist without absorbing the juices of other vegetables.
Seite 219 - ... bottom. Then arrange the plant according to system, and lay one between every two pages of the fasciculi. The fasciculi are formed into bundles, by being laid alternately up and down upon each other, as they do not lie conveniently when the heads of the plants are all at the top of the bundle, because the stalks and roots are thicker than the flowers. These bundles, consisting each of ten fasciculi, may be covered by pieces of pasteboard tied by strings. The collection is kept on the shelves...
Seite 218 - ... between two boards, with a weight over them. The second series is similarly treated next day, and so on. The paper from which the plants have been removed is to be dried for future use. There will thus be four sets of plants : two in the first stage of drying, and two in the second stage. The plants of the second stage sets should be taken out about three days after they have been deposited, and after dry paper has been put about them, returned to their places. The paper may thus be shifted until...
Seite 218 - The plants of the second stage sets should be taken out about three days after they have been deposited, and after dry paper has been put about them, returned to their places. The paper may thus be shifted until the plants be perfectly dry, when they are finally removed. Each plant is then placed in a sheet of dry paper, and along with it is deposited a slip of paper, on which are written the name of the plant, the place in which it was gathered, the time of gathering, the soil, and such other circumstances...
Seite 4 - ... carried to their stations by the very act of vegetation, develope themselves at the period when the plant, or that part where they lie, begins to die, then feed upon the substance of the plant during...
Seite 17 - Hunefield recommends a new method of drying plants, by covering them first with the powder of lycopodium, and then placing them in a vessel containing chloride of calcium. By this method the colour and flexibility are preserved. On the 29th of July, 1831, the thermometer being at 53J•, Dr.
Seite 62 - The new botanist's guide to the localities of the rarer plants of Britain; on the plan of Turner and Dillwyn's Botanist's guide.

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