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Hearn, to be considered a British bird

30

STUTCHBURY, SAMUEL, A.L.S., &c.

Description of a new fossil Avicula from the Lias Shale of So-
'mersetshire

· 163
THOMPSON, GEORGE.

On the fall of a shower of Meteoric Stones at the Cape - 145

THOMPSON, William, F.L.S., &c.

On some Snow Crystals observed on the 14th of January, 1838 107

Zoological Notes on a few Species obtained from the South
West of Scotland

- 585
WATERHOUSE, George R., M.E.S., &c.

Observations on the Rodentia, with a view to an arrangement
of the
group founded upon the structure of the crania

90, 184, 274, 593

WEISSENBORN, W., D.Ph.

Record of the curious capture of a White-headed Eagle, in the

river Havel

· 197

Remark relatin
to the nature of the Ignis fatuus

- 197

Note on an extinct species of Frog in yellow Amber

- 256

Notice of an immense erratic block of Granite

. 472

of a newly discovered metal, called Lantanum

- 472

Note on the formation of an Entomological Society in Stettin 472

On the Natural History of the German Marmot 473, 533, 577

On a great migration of Dragon-flies observed in Germany - 516
Note on some new facts in the nature of mineral precipitates - 567
Note on the Ushar or Abuk (Asclepias procera) of the Senaar 568
Notice of a valuable collection of objects in Natural History,
bought by the Belgian Government

- 568
Notice of the decease of Count Caspar Sternberg-Serowitz - 567

WESTWOOD, J. O., F.L.S., &c.

On Hymenotes, a genus of exotic Orthopterous Insects . 489

WETHERELL, NATHANIEL, F.G.S.

Notice of a species of Rotalia found attached to specimens of
Vermetus Bognoriensis

- 162
-of some undescribed Organic Remains from the London

Clay

496

White, Adam, M.E.S., &c.

Description of two new species of Beetles, belonging to the
Family Cetoniida of MacLeay

24

Description of two Hemipterous Insects

• 537

WILLMOT, E. EARDLY.
Record of the Woodcock breeding at Berkswell

- 255

Wilson, W. K.

Account of the capture of an inmense Saw-fish, in the Gulf of

Paria

519

WooD, SEARLES, V., F.G.S., &c.

On the species of the genus Lima occurring in the Crag - 233
On the species of the genus Bulla occurring in the Crag 460
Letter announcing the discovery of Fossil Quadrumanous Re-
mains near Woodbridge, Suffolk

444
Woods, Henry, F.L.S., &c.

Letter addressed to the Editor respecting the supposed Frontal
Spine of Hybodus in the Bath Museum

282
YARRELL, WILLIAM, F.L.S., &c.

Remarks appended to Mr. Long's communication on the dis-
covery of the Nest and Eggs of the Crossbill at Farnham.

236

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Agassiz,

Louis, (Professor.)
Monographie d'Echinodermes -

- 499
ALEXANDER, SIR James EDWARD.

An Expedition of Discovery into the Interior of Africa, under

the auspices of Her Majesty's Government, and the Royal
Geographical Society

- 401

Aube, Ch.

Species Général des Coléoptères

• 248

BEALE, THOMAS.

The Natural History of the Sperm Whale.

- 248

EHRENBERG, PROF.

The Infusoria as Perfect Organisms; a glance into the deeper

organic life of Nature. With an Atlas of 64 coloured plates,

after drawings executed by the author.

- 508

HALIDAY, A. H.

Hymenoptera Britannica, (Oxyura). 309; Hymenoptera Bri-

tannica, (Alysia).

- 363

GERMAR, FRIEDRICH.

Zeitschrift für die Entomologie.

248

HARRIS, CAPT. W.C.

Narrative of an Expedition into Southern Africa, during the

years 1836 and 1837.

- 401

Hope, Rev. F. W.

The Coleopterists' Manual, (parts 1 & 2); containing the La-

mellicorns, and predaceous Land and Water Beetles of Lin-

næus and Fabricius.

306

MacLEAY, W. S.

Annulosa, contained in part 3 of Andrew Smith's Illustrations
of the Zoology of South Africa.

38

SHUCKARD, W. E.

Elements of British Entomology; containing a General Intro-

duction to the Science, a Systematic Description of all the

Genera, and a list of all the Species, of British Insects; &c. 503

British Coleoptera Delineated; consisting of Figures of all the

Genera of British Beetles.

- 507

Walker, Francis, F.L.S.
Monographia Chalciditum.

- 363
YARRELL, WM.
Supplement to the History of British Fishes. -

- 364
On the Growth of the Salmon in Fresh Water.

. 365

Note.—When a contributor's name is preceded by two asterisks, (**)
it indicates his having communicated specimens only for description.

LIST of the SUPPLEMENTARY PLATES, with references to the descriptive Letter-press in the body of the Magazine.

PLATE I. Portrait on steel of William Smith, LL.D., in his 69th year;—the anthor of “Strata Identified,' and generally known as the 'Father of English Geology.' Page 213.

PLATB II.

Lamia Boisduvalii, Hope; a new species from New Holland, in the cabinet of the Rev. F. W. Hope, F.R.S., Pres. Entomol. Soc. Page 230.

PLATE III.

Fossil Shells of the genus Lima, from the Crag of Suffolk, in the cabinet of S. V. Wood, Esq., F.G.S., &ɔ. Page 233.

PLATE IV. Fossil remains of a species of Shark from the Lias of Lyme Regis, belonging to the extinct genus Hybodus, Agass., in ehe cabinet of Edmund Higgins, Esq. Page 242.

PLATES V. and VI.

Twc views of the Paper Nautilus (Argonauta), showing the manner in which the shell is embraced by the two membranous arms of the Poulp, as observed by Madame Jeannette Power and M. Rang. Pp. 529 and 530.

PLATE VII.

Fossil shells of the genus Bulla from the Crag, in the cabinet of Mr. S. V. Wood. Page 460.

PLATES VIII. and IX. Figures of some very remarkable unknown organic remains from the London Clay, in the cabinet of N. Wetherell, Esq., of Highgate. Pa. 496

THE MAGAZINE

OF

NATURAL HISTORY.

JANUARY, 1839.

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Art. I. Observations upon the Fossil Jaws from the Oolitic Beds

at Stonesfield, named Didelphis Prevostii and Did. Bucklandii.

By M. A. VALENCIENNES. The fossil bones of very small vertebrated animals discovered in the colitic beds of calcareous schist at Stonesfield, have acquired great notoriety among geologists, in consequence of the opinion formed respecting them by M. Cuvier, upon a first inspection.

It will be remembered that upon examining the rather mutilated half jaw in the Oxford Museum, shown to him by Professor Buckland, Cuvier recognised the characters of a mammal, which he pronounced to be of the order Marsupialia.

In no other way can we explain why Cuvier applied to them the name of Didelphis. His ideas respecting them appear to convey precisely this meaning; not only in the note page

359 of the second part of ol. y. of his Ossements Fossiles,' but in the expressions which he uses in the text of the same page. While enumerating the endless variety of fossils found in the Stonesfield slate, he says, “and even, as I am assured, two fragments of jaws, which, judging from a hasty inspection made when at Oxford in 1818, seemed to me to belong to some Didelphis."

The extract from his note is as follows.-" It (the drawing] confirms me in the idea which a first inspection had given me : it is the jaw of a very small carnassier, the grinders of which very much resemble those of the opossums;

at

‘Comptes Rendus,' Sept., 1838, p. 572. Vol. III, No. 25. N. S.

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