History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles, 1713-1783, Band 2

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Seite 220 - If all be true that I do think, There are five reasons we should drink: Good wine— a friend— or being dry— Or lest we should be, by and by— Or any other reason why!
Seite 344 - ... their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans ; nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians ; nor from up to down, like the Chinese ; but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.
Seite 175 - And sensible soft melancholy. "Has she no faults then, (Envy says) Sir?" Yes, she has one, I must aver; When all the world conspires to praise her, The woman's deaf, and does not hear.
Seite 57 - Then said they all, Art thou then the Son of God ? And he said unto them, Ye say that I am.
Seite 97 - ... suffering me to see them before he was paid, or giving me good security to restore my money for those that were lean, or shorn, or scabby, I would be none of his customer. I have heard of a man who had a mind to sell his house, and therefore carried a piece of brick in his pocket, which he showed as a pattern to encourage purchasers: and this is directly the case in point with Mr. Wood's assay.
Seite 323 - The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know, from the first act to the last, that the stage is only a stage, and that the players are only players.
Seite 383 - I here aver is the naked fact ; let every man account for it as he sees good.) I then thought, Cannot God heal either man or beast, by any means, or without any ? Immediately my weariness and headache ceased, and my horse's lameness in the same instant. Nor did he halt any more either that day or the next.
Seite 344 - I shall say but little at present of their Learning, which for many Ages hath flourished in all its Branches among them : But their manner of Writing is very peculiar, being neither from the Left to the Right, like the Europeans ; nor from the Right to the Left, like the Arabians ; nor from up to down, like the Chinese , nor from down to up, like the Cascagians ; but aslant from one Corner of the Paper to the other, like Ladies in England.
Seite 187 - That it is an indignity to , and a breach of the privilege of this house , for any person to presume to give, in written or printed newspapers, any account or minutes of the debates, or other proceedings of this house or of any committee thereof; and that upon discovery of the outhors , etc. this house will proceed against the offenders with the utmost severity.
Seite 333 - I don't know how it is, but she said very right : there is something in Spenser that pleases one as strongly in one's old age, as it did in one's youth. I read the Faerie Queene, when I was about twelve, with infinite delight; and I think it gave me as much, when I read it over about a year or two ago.

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