The Arts of Beauty: Or, Secrets of a Lady's Toilet

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Dick & Fitzgerald, 1858 - 132 Seiten
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Inhalt

I
19
II
24
III
26
IV
29
V
32
VI
34
VII
37
VIII
39
XV
63
XVI
67
XVII
70
XVIII
73
XIX
77
XX
80
XXI
82
XXII
85

IX
43
X
47
XI
50
XII
54
XIII
57
XIV
60
XXIII
87
XXIV
89
XXV
91
XXVI
93
XXVII
95
XXVIII
96

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Seite 30 - ... of female charms, it is not in the power of Esculapius himself to refit the shattered bark, or of the Syrens, with all their songs and wiles, to save its battered sides from the rocks, and make it ride the sea in gallant trim again.
Seite 25 - There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple : If the ill spirit have so fair a house, Good things will strive to dwell with't.
Seite 40 - ... days. Constant application. STICKING-PLASTER. Stretch a piece of black silk on a wooden frame, and apply dissolved isinglass to one side of it with a brush. Let it dry, repeat the process, and then cover with a strong tincture of balsam of Peru. To IMPROVE THE COMPLEXION. The whites of four eggs boiled in rose-water, half an ounce of alum, half an ounce of oil of sweet almonds ; beat the whole together until it assumes the consistency of paste. Spread upon a silk or muslin mask, to be worn at...
Seite 102 - When we see a fellow loud and talkative, full of insipid life and laughter, we may venture to pronounce him a female favourite.
Seite 49 - ... my fair friends must understand that it is only tolerated. Good sense must so preside over its application, that its tint on the cheek may always be fainter than what nature's pallet would have painted. A violently rouged woman is one of the most disgusting objects to the eye. The excessive red on the face gives a coarseness to every feature, and a general fierceness to the countenance, which transforms the elegant lady of fashion into a vulgar harridan.
Seite 51 - ... are well informed as to the physical management of this part of their bodies. The bosom, which nature has formed with exquisite symmetry in itself, and admirable adaptation to the parts of the figure to which it is united, is often transformed into a shape, and transplanted to a place which deprives it of its original beauty and harmony with the rest of the person. This deforming metamorphosis is effected by means of stiff stays, or corsets, which force the part out of its natural position, and...
Seite 89 - HOW TO SOFTEN AND BEAUTIFY THE HAIR. THERE is no greater mistake than the profuse use of greases for the purpose of softening the hair. They obstruct the pores, the free action of which is so necessary for the health of the hair. No substance should be employed which cannot be readily absorbed by the vessels. These preparations make the hair dry and harsh, unless perpetually loaded with an offensive and disgusting amount of grease. There was a celebrated beauty at Munich who had one of the handsomest...
Seite 42 - Every young girl ought early to be impressed that whatever destroys health spoils her beauty. made of a simple tincture of benzoin precipitated by water. All you have to do in preparing it is to take a small piece of the gum benzoin and boil it in spirits of wine till it becomes a rich tincture. Fifteen drops of this, poured into a glass of water, will produce a mixture which will look like milk, and emits a most agreeable perfume. This delightful wash seems to have the effect of calling the purple...
Seite 97 - ... and are occasioned by coagulated lymph that obstructs the pores of the skin. They may be squeezed out by pressing the skin, and ignorant people suppose them to be little worms. They are permanently removed by washing with warm water, and severe friction with a towel, and then applying a little of the following preparation : Liquor of potassa 1 oz. Cologne 2 oz.
Seite 73 - ... gratify an innocent love of finery. From the sketch here given it will be seen that our good grandmothers differed considerably in their ideas of a fine figure from their scantily dressed descendants of the present day.

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