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in which his nerves unexpectedly his arms ache, he said, and he betrayed themselves. We truly do described the sensation as espenot know what is going on within cially unpleasant along the nerves us, and it would not surprise any and muscles of the forearms. In doctor to be told confidentially by an African desert he would have any one that a discovery had been been invaluable ; and we often told made that the nerves were giving him that one of the African comway.

Imagination has a great panies should give him a salary responsibility in these matters. and employ him to find water in Men of little imagination are not dry places. When he walked with "given to give way." So, if you us, often and often he has told us have to do anything which is try- that water ran somewhere far ing, and require an assistant or down under his feet. We believed companion, don't take a man en- him or disbelieved him as we liked, dowed with imagination. Look for it was only when we knew rather for a fool than a clever that a stream was close at hand

At all events, do not at that we could test him. He had tempt anything risky with a man also a sensation when placed near who thinks too much.

certain metals. Whether all this All these sapient thoughts arise arose from magnetism or from because of Cecil Wake, who, al- some electrical affinities, we were though an excellent fellow, thought not wise enough to determine. To too much. Perhaps it was because electricity I ascribed his sensitiveof this that he had become better ness; others called it by other than any barometer for telling a names. At all events, there it change in weather. Snow always was, a most palpable fact, showing gave him headache-thunder al- itself with a power so strong that ways gave him headache; but he if, for instance, he grasped our bore these afllictions uncomplain- wrists, we became aware of a force ingly. But we knew in summer running into our being; and it from an extra twitch about his lifted bazel - twigs in our hands mouth that should have when he was thus holding us, so thundery weather. In winter snow that we felt the wood pressing itfaithfully followed

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self against our fingers if we resignals. We discovered another sisted the impulse given to it by peculiarity in him, and some of his him through our bodies. friends declared that they had Why should persons formed found a treasure in him at last, exactly alike as far as the mere because he had one gift that could presence of blood, bone, sinew, and be usefully employed for money. nerves is concerned, be so variously He was a marvellous water-finder. affected? If there be such great For this he employed the time- forces at work, why do they not honoured instrument, the hazel pervade all sentient flesh ? fork. He held the two ends of ask many questions, but the true the hazel between his thumb and replies are not as yet vouchsafed forefinger, the fork turned down to us; perhaps they will never be. wards, and whenever he came any. There will always be creatures where near running water the fork whose eyes see, and ears hear, end of the hazel rose in the air; what is unknown to the many. and the stick not only did this, The presence of influences in the but twisted and turned in his hand world around us will thrill through as though in an agony. It made those who, endowed with ethereal

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qualities, feel things which most of landlord he wanted a room to us, fashioned with more earthly himself, however small. Excellent substance, failed to discern. as Swiss hotels are, they cannot

Notwithstanding his exquisite contain more rooms than they do susceptibility, Wake was a pleasant contain, and the landlord said he companion, and did not take amiss could not give another unless he any amusement afforded to his gave his own, and that he could grosser comrades by his peculiar- not do, for he had a wife and I ities. He was fond of making don't know how many children excursions on foot through the sleeping there. So there was no Swiss highlands; and one com- help for it, and the landlord repanion only was what he asked tired. I told Wake that I feared and generally obtained, for we all there was no avoiding the inconliked him, and he was easily venience, and that he must allow pleased. Content with almost me a bed, and that I promised anything except constant noise not to snore. But although he at or stormy weather, he would plod first made no demur, and although along, singing sometimes to him- I had my bag carried up to the self, and full of interest in all he room, he presently began to look

The only circumstance that so unhappy—so ridiculously put made him seem at all unreason- out and twitchy—that I, to whom able was in the matter of accom- it was a matter of perfect indiffermodation at an inn. The hotels ence whether I slept in a bed or were often crowded; but however on a sofa, said that I had made full they might be, Wake always up my mind not to plague him by insisted on having a room to him- my presence, and that I would go self. He said he could not sleep down and sleep on a couch I had with another person snoring in observed in the dining-room of the another bed, however remote, in hotel, which we had passed as we the same room.

came in before mounting the stairs. This unreasonable apprehension He thanked me effusively, and alwas especially aggravating when I though I thought him rather selfwas with him on one of these ish I shook his hand and wished excursions, for I am an excellent him pleasant dreams. He said walker, and an excellent sleeper, that he would not act thus were it and feel certain that I never snore. not that he felt that he himself People don't who lie on their would be an annoyance to me; for side and not on their back, and unless he slept well, his restlessI know that I never lie on my ness would be sufficient to keep us back; and if ever disagreeable, I both awake. am only disagreeable when I am “ Besides,” he added, to my awake. But this assertion had astonishment, - there very no influence with Cecil Wake. peculiar influences at work here, We had arrived late and hungry and especially, as it seems to me, at an inn, and were shown a room in that part of the room where where there were two beds, the your bed” (indicating the one near one with its back to the side of the door) "is placed, and I would the room where was the window, much rather that no friend of and the other placed with its head mine slept there. I cannot tell the other way, and near the door. you what it is, but it is palpableThere was a considerable interval palpable,” he repeated, with a sigh between the beds. Wake told the and a shudder, "and I shall cer

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tainly take the bed near the win- were the lightning to strike the dow, where I can get fresh air.”

house.

The position of Wake's I said, “Nonsense, old man; room immediately over the diningthunder in the air, and on your room occurred to me. I ran over nerves, as usual. Nice clean bed- in my mind the construction of what's the matter with it?" But the place, its verandahs, and its as I said this, a draught coming many windows under the tall roof from the door blew out my candle, which had a great gable. I wonand made his flicker so that he dered if there was a lightningshaded it with his hand, causing conductor, and thought how the the shadow of the hand to fall on chimney was placed, and if the that side of the room where the stories of bolts coming down chimdoor and the bed were, and I neys were true.

Pah! what nonlooked, and while I was speaking sense! Why should I have such the shadow of his fingers above ideas? Let me go to sleep again. the bed seemed to make them What did it matter, one thunderpoint on the wall at something, storm or more among the Alps, and underneath the shadow of which were always re-echoing such them the bed appeared to my concerts? Then I looked round fancy to be shining in an odd way. me, and I saw the door I had enWaves of phosphorescence, like tered by slowly opening, and in that seen in the sky when it is lit another moment Wake's face apby auroral light, floated over it, peared, then his body followed, and illuminated the white sheets. clothed in his dressing-gown. I hastily lit my candle again at Are you here, D-?he his, and repeating my “good- asked. night,” went out at the door, an “Yes, yes, here I am, quite comodd chilly sensation passing down fortable,” I replied, thinking lazily my back as I did so. I found the that he might have suddenly becouch in the dining-room, lay come uneasy about my accommodadown on it, put my plaid over my

tion. “Here I am, woke by this legs, and was soon sound asleep. beastly thunderstorm. I suppose

During the early hours of morn- it woke you?” ing there must have been a storm He came to me without answerwhich failed to wake me. As it ing, and by a night - light I had came nearer, however, I became kept burning I saw that he looked half - conscious, and my thoughts much disturbed. taking pleasant shapes, made me

- Never mind me now, in my dream imagine myself at "I am all right. What is it that breakfast with Wake, preparatory has disturbed you ?” to a start for a mountain ramble, He was silent a moment, and I saw before me on the clean table- then said in quick whispered tones, cloth the low glass jar of the in- “I want you to come with me.” evitable Swiss honey, and my

" Where to?" I asked. mouth seemed filled with the ex- Up to my room. I wish to cellent bread - and - butter, and I see if you see what I see there. lifted to my lips the cup of café Come at once. au lait, but a sudden jar made me I was still feeling very lazy, but drop the cup, and with a start I felt that he was in earnest, and awoke. A loud peal of thunder rolled out of the sofa with a grunt, shook the hotel, and I lay on my saying, “ All right, old man; any. back thinking what would happen thing to please you.” Then as I

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followed bis retreating figure, I on the bed on which he had reasked, “But what is it?

posed. He sat down on it also, “ Never mind, come—come,” he seating himself more towards its said, and we re-entered the bed- foot, as I had placed myself next

the pillows. His body was thus He had a candle burning beside between me and the other bed. the bed he had occupied, the one He took my hand, then seeing that near the window. The other bed, I rather shrank from this childlike next the door, had evidently re- treatment, he put his hand on my mained untouched. There was no arm, and said,

“ Hush—do wait, sign of any pressure on the pillow, and see again if you see nothing.” nor was there any disturbance of So we watched, the rain making the blankets and sheets. As I its noise against the window. Ι passed to the interior of the room whispered, “Do you see anything I again felt chilly for a moment. that you keep on telling me to We approached the window, which watch, and looking so oddly always was seamed with the beating rain, at the corner ?Wake faced round and asked me Yes, I see them still, but to look at the bed near the door. fainter," he replied.

“ Can you see anything there ?" Then came another blinding he asked,

flame of blue light, and I-I, lookWhy, no, the bed — what do ing at that empty bed, saw upon you mean?” I replied.

it the form of a man, and around " Wait,” he said, “ for the next him was gathered a group of flash, and then tell me what you figures, half-seen, but lighted with see, keeping your eyes on the bed,” the light that had filled the room he added excitedly, but in a low with the flash, and had gone again and, as it appeared to me, fear- —there it was, lingering still on struck voice.

that form in the bed, and lighting We waited, but not for long, for up the side of the figures around very soon a fierce light beat in him. The figure on the bed was again, as the lightning ran down, that of a dead man, but although illumining every corner of the the corpse

the corpse was phosphorescent, room, and showing the white un- under the half-closed lids the eyes ruffled bed most distinctly. gleamed as though their blind orbs " Now and now

there !” were of living fire. The glow comWake exclaimed.

ing from him seemed to be the “Well, all is dark, except for radiance that lighted the sorrowing your candlelight, which seems group that gazed down upon him. weak and yellow enough after As I looked the apparition became that flash,” I said loudly; for the fainter and fainter, until the little thunder had pealed out as soon as yellow candle-flame was all that the flash disappeared, and rolled on lit the room, and the bed again with its reverberations as though was empty, and the white sheets the sound would never cease. lay close up to the pillow next the

“ Look at them—you must see wall as though nothing had ever that

group around him," Cecil ' been there. I now felt my arm said. "No - you don't. Well, aching where Wake's hand was on wait till the next flash."

it, and I moved it and gently dis“What is it?” I asked ; and placed his hand with my disenfeeling a little faint, which I had gaged one, and said, “Wake, I

I hardly ever felt before, I sat down thought I saw a group of men

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around a body in that bed, but it “I am sorry I called you," he must be some odd effect of the said, amiably. lightning playing tricks with re- “Oh, we had best not talk of flections from that mirror!” the effect of light we thought we

“ You think so ?” he said, with saw, and it's of no use to mention a sad smile that softened the it to others," I replied. twitching of the corners of his Why?” he asked. mouth. “Well, if you stay, you

“Simply," I said, “because nomay see it again,-I see it now.” body will believe us.”

“But I don't, and it's all non- We left the hotel, and I think sense, I said desperately, deter- it must have been at least a week mined not to give in; “but I'll tell afterwards that in another hotel you what it is, Cecil, I'll not leave we came upon a number of an old the room.

Give us a hand with illustrated newspaper in the read-
I'll take the feath- ing-room,

Cecil had it in his ered cushion thing and a blanket, hand, and gave it to me, pointing and lie near you until morning, and with his finger at a paragraph that bed may take care of itself. which read thus :I agree so far with you that I won't sleep in it."

“We regret to learn that a sad The storm was moving farther accident took place last Wednesday away. There were some fainter at -gen, the particulars of which flashes, but I saw nothing of our

have cast a gloom over the place, and

have so affected the amiable host of strangely lit companions, and after the —hoff, that he has shut up his tossing about on the improvised house a full fortnight before the bed on the floor, and seeing Cecil usual end of the season, which has still half - raised on his pillows always filled full his hospitable and and gazing still at bed No. 2, I be- excellent place of entertainment and came unconscious of storm, Cecil

, healthy lodging. Mr G., an English or phantoms, and slept till the gentleman, who was travelling alone,

was carried into the hotel during a morning light, and the boot's thunderstorm, struck dead by lightcheerful “ Sechs Uhr" and double ning, which damaged also a little knock warned us to prepare for part of the house, close to which he our day's work. Cecil rose, and was standing under the shelter of a we went together down to the chestnut-tree. The body was placed dining-room, both very silent, and

on a bed, and means were tried to wondering if anything would be produce sensibility, but without avail.

His brother has arrived from Engasked by host or waiters about our land, and the corpse will probably night's rest. We breakfasted, the be buried at —gen, his brother thinkhost

came and wished us good ing that the carriage to England of morning, and gave information the gentleman's body is unnecessary,

fine about our route, and spoke of the although he has, it is said, storm, but of nothing else, and I

estate in that country, and might have turned to Cecil after he had gone, English “home and comfort,' and to

expected to have ended his life amid saying that I could not explain lave rested with his ancestors.” the night's vision, but thought we must have eaten something that I put down the paper. had produced a disagreement in our The place mentioned was that digestions and an agreement in our where Cecil Wake had caused me symptoms. He was still excited to see what, I still try to think, and nervous, and looked as though was an effect of his own imaginhe had not slept at all.

ation !

AN ELECTRICIAN.

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