The Channel islands pilot, or, Sailing directions for Guernsey, Serk, Alderney, and Jersey

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1870
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Seite 39 - WSW wind, from the long fetch it commands, brings in a heavy swell; and the obstruction caused by the weather tide coming through the Gouliot pass, raises it to such a height, as to preclude the possibility of a vessel riding out even a moderate gale. Should a vessel, therefore, be...
Seite 42 - ... sets in a northeasterly direction, the second hour it changes to the northwestward, from the third to the sixth hour it runs westward and southwestward. The stream in the Gouliot Pass runs for equal spaces of time corresponding to that in the Great Russel, and does not partake of the irregularity of the tides in its vicinity. On the contrary, the force and shape of the flood stream, acquired by the contracted and peculiar form of the channel between Serk and Brecqhou, is continued until it falls...
Seite 7 - ... fathoms, because during that interval the wind and tide unite in driving the ship to the south-eastward ; it is equally imprudent with southerly, south-westerly, and westerly winds, to lay a vessel's head to the south-eastward, between half-flood and high water, for. the same reason, the wind and tide contributing to drive her to the north-eastward ; with all easterly winds, the islands become a weather shore, and may consequently be made free with as discretion may point out. Further : a position...
Seite 13 - ... 215° nearly. At the northeastern entrance of the Little Russel, however, between the Braye and Amfroque Rocks, it takes the direction of the offing stream, viz, the first two hours of the flood it sets directly for the northern end of Herm Island, gradually joining the southwestern stream through the Russel, and the last hour of the flood as well as the first of the ebb joining the northeastern stream. To understand the various sets of the tides in the Russel Channels and around the outer shores...
Seite 72 - WSW ; and the last 2 hours, that is, from low water till half-flood, sets SW ; and the contrary for the first and last 3J hours of the north-eastern stream ; which between half-flood and high water, sets very strongly round Cape La Hague.
Seite 2 - To show the strange effects of refraction, it may be noticed, that from a station near Verclut guard-house in Jersey, the top of the south-eastern battlement, of Seymour tower exactly coincides with the line of the visible horizon at low water equinoctial spring tides ; sometimes, however, when viewed from the same position, it has appeared considerably below that line, and in several instances above it. In this case the line of sight passes partially over the surface of the rocky ledge called the...
Seite 34 - ... Anglican service is conducted in French, and two endowed schools, also a Wesleyan Chapel and three hotels. A close approach to Serk on all but the northwestern side is difficult, not only from the numerous rocks which encompass it, but also from the rapidity and irregularities of the tidal streams in its immediate vicinity. These difficulties, however, may be easily overcome if attention is paid to the leading marks and run of the stream, and the island affords good shelter against almost all...
Seite 41 - The southern stream commences at 4 hours flood and runs until half an hour after low water, when the northern stream commences and runs faintly for the remaining 3^ hours, or until 4 hours flood again.
Seite 50 - Ortac, gradually veers to the northward and sets NNE until it again 'unites with the stream flowing round the northern side of the Casquets. The south-western stream of this channel, which commences at half-ebb, sets right over the L'Equet and the Fourquies, to avoid which the utmost care must be taken.
Seite 78 - ... St. Ouen Bay present themselves, as also the tower on 1'Etac Point and the remarkable rock known as the Pinnacle, between that point and Grosnez Point : and finally, the declining land to the southeastward, with its well-wooded surface and its shore of sand and rock. Jersey is encompassed by dangers rendered doubly formidable by the great rise and fall, as well as by the rapidity, of the tides. On the northwestern and western sides are the Banc Desormes.

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