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ZOOLOGY, BOTANY, MINERALOGY, GEOLOGY,

AND METEOROLOGY.

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CONDUCTED
By J. C. LOUDON, F.L. G. & Z.S.
MEMBER OF VARIOUS NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETIES ON THE CONTINENT.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR
LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMAN,

PATERNOSTER-ROW.

PREFACE.

Nine years have now elapsed since the commencement of the Magazine of Natural History; and, during that period, we have endeavoured to conduct it in such a manner, that, while a large proportion of the contributions to its pages have been of a nature directly tending to an extension of our knowledge in the various departments of Natural History, it should, at the same time, not be deficient in subjects of general interest to those who derive gratification from some knowledge and observance of Nature's laws, although they may not enter upon their investigation as a science.

To a considerable extent, we think that this combination has been happily effected; and, in presenting our Readers and Correspond. ents with the completion of the Ninth Volume, we trust that it is one which will not be found to contain less instructive, or less interesting, matter than those which have preceded it. Among the communications which will be perused with pleasure, are several from our old and valued correspondent, Mr. R. C. Taylor, whose contributions on Fossil Zoology and Botany, published in one of the early Volumes of this Magazine, were publicly alluded to, in terms of the highest commendation, by one of our most distinguished Geological Professors, at the late assembly of the British Association at Bristol.

We have occasionally been told that miscellaneous communications are allowed to appear in our pages, which sometimes do not constitute additions to the vast fund of knowledge which we possess relating to the economy of Nature. We readily admit the fact; but it should be borne in mind, that one principal object with us has been that of exciting and promoting a spirit of enquiry, and a habit of observation, among those who, perhaps, did not previously possess the taste, or the means, for acquiring an insight into those delightful pursuits which are attendant upon the study of Natural History. Had our Journal been appropriated exclusively to subjects of deep research, and only open to the communications of experienced Naturalists, it might have taken a higher stand as a philosophical work, but it would not have been productive of the general good that it was our object to promote, and which has undoubtedly arisen from the course which we have followed.

At the present time, there seems so generally diffused a feeling in favour of those objects for which this Work was originally instituted, that it appears to us a desirable opportunity for the commencement of a new series. This plan will prove a great ad

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