The River War: An Account of the Reconquest of the Sudan

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Digireads.com Publishing, 2009 - 240 Seiten
Before he was the Prime Minister of England, and before he was even in Parliament, Winston Churchill was a soldier, stationed first in India and then in Sudan. His early years in the British army form the background for this historical work, which is actually his second published book. Written in 1899, it is an account of Britain's re-conquest of the Sudan, providing a description of the British conflict led by Lord Kitchener against Islamic Jihadists set to conquer Egypt and drive out infidels. Many battles and important figures are described, from the murder of General Charles George Gordon, to the siege at Khartoum, to the Battle of Omdurman. Throughout the work there is also a generous amount of commentary concerning Mohammedanism, British attitude to the war, the modern machinery of war, such as the telegraph, and its relative effectiveness. Churchill was ready to criticize if he found fault, and some of this censure was removed when his political career began. This edition is an unabridged version of Churchill's work, first written as a soldier, war correspondent, and young man with a bright and momentous future before him.

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Über den Autor (2009)

Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was born at Blenheim Palace on November 30, 1874 and educated at Harrow and Sandhurst. His military service included periods spent in Cuba, India, the Sudan, and in France during World War I. He became a Member of Parliament in 1900 and held many high offices of state under four different prime ministers. He was the Prime Minister of Great Britain during World War II. Churchill's writing career began with campaign reports including The Story of the Malakand Field Force and The River War. In 1900, he published his only novel Savrola. His other works include Lord Randolph Churchill; Marlborough, a four-volume biography of his ancestor the 1st Duke of Marlborough; The World Crisis, a four-volume history of World War I; The Second World War, a six-volume history; and A History of the English. History of the English-Speaking Peoples, a six-volume work was completed toward the end of his life. In 1953, Churchill received the Nobel Prize for Literature, in recognition of his extensive writing as well as for his speeches throughout his career as a statesman. That same year, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died on January 24, 1965 at the age of 90.

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