For Friendship's Sake ...: Emerson, Lubbock, Bacon, Etc

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Dodge publishing Company, 1900 - 90 Seiten

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Seite 78 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company; and faces are but a gallery of pictures; and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Seite 85 - ... certain it is, that whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thoughts, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up in the communicating and discoursing with another...
Seite 50 - Magna civitas, magna solitudo; because in a great town friends are scattered, so that there is not that fellowship for the most part which is in less neighbourhoods. But we may go further and affirm most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness...
Seite 18 - The valiant warrior famoused for fight, After a hundred victories, once foiled, Is from the book of honor razed quite, And all the rest forgot for which he toiled.
Seite 32 - It suffices me. It is a spiritual gift, worthy of him to give and of me to receive. It profanes nobody.
Seite 79 - A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings and suffocations are the most dangerous in the body ; and it is not much otherwise in the mind...
Seite 87 - ... for our case; but the best receipt (best I say to work and best to take) is the admonition of a friend. It is a strange thing to behold what gross errors and extreme absurdities many (especially of the greater sort...
Seite 77 - IT had been hard for him that spake it to have put more truth and untruth together in few words than in that speech : Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god.
Seite 84 - I will conclude this first fruit of friendship), which is, that this communicating of a man's self to his friend works two contrary effects; for it redoubleth joys, and cutteth griefs in halves : for there is no man that imparteth his joys to his friend, but he joyeth the more ;• and no man that imparteth his griefs to his friend, but he grieveth the less.
Seite 29 - I hate, where I looked for a manly furtherance, or at least a manly resistance, to find a mush of concession. Better be a nettle in the side of your friend than his echo.

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