Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

into, but not operate or unload materials from, scrap paper balers and paper box compactors

“(i) that are safe for 16- and 17-year-old employees loading the scrap paper balers or paper box compactors; and

“(ii) that cannot be operated while being loaded.

“(B) For purposes of subparagraph (A), scrap paper balers and paper box compactors shall be considered safe for 16- or 17-year-old employees to load only if

“(i)(I) the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors meet the American National Standards Institute's Standard ANSI Z245.5– 1990 for scrap paper balers and Standard ANSI Z245.2—1992 for paper box compactors;

or

Mollohan
Roberts

Tejeda
Montgomery Roemer

Thompson
Moran

Ros-Lehtinen Thornton
Morella
Rose

Thurman
Murtha
Roukema

Tiahrt
Myers

Roybal-Allard Torkildsen
Nadler
Rush

Torres
Neal
Sabo

Torricelli
Nethercutt
Sanders

Towns
Neumann
Sanford

Traficant
Oberstar
Sawyer

Velazquez
Obey
Saxton

Vento
Olver
Schroeder

Visclosky
Ortiz
Schumer

Volkmer
Orton
Scott

Walsh
Owens
Serrano

Ward
Packard
Shays

Waters
Pallone
Sisisky

Watt (NC)
Pastor
Skaggs

Watts (OK)
Payne (NJ)
Skelton

Waxman
Payne (VA) Slaughter

White
Pelosi
Smith (NJ)

Whitfield
Peterson (MN) Smith (WA) Williams
Pickett
Solomon

Wilson
Pomeroy
Souder

Wise
Poshard
Spratt

Wolf
Quinn
Stark

Woolsey
Radanovich Stenholm

Wynn
Rahall
Stokes

Yates
Rangel
Studds

Young (AK)
Reed
Stupak

Zimmer
Richardson

Tate Rivers

Taylor (MS)

NOT VOTING-13
Bevill
Hayes

Roth
Coleman
Lincoln

Tanner
Collins (IL) McDade

Young (FL) Ford

Peterson (FL) Hastings (FL) Quillen

So the bill was not passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby said bill was not passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

“(V) the name of the manufacturer and the model number of the scrap paper baler or paper box compactor involved in the incident.

"(iv) The reports described in clause (i) shall be submitted to the Secretary promptly, but not later than 10 days after the date on which an incident relating to an injury or death occurred.

“(v) The Secretary may not rely solely on the reports described in clause (i) as the basis for making a determination that any of the employers described in clause (i) has violated a provision of section 12 relating to oppressive child labor or a regulation or order issued pursuant to section 12. The Secretary shall, prior to making such a determination, conduct an investigation and inspection in accordance with section 12(b).

(vi) The reporting requirements of this subparagraph shall expire 2 years after the date of enactment of this subparagraph.”. SEC. 2. CIVIL MONEY PENALTY.

Section 16(e) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 216(e)) is amended in the first sentence

(1) by striking "section 12," and inserting "section 12 or section 13(c)(5),”?; and

(2) by striking "that section" and inserting "section 12 or section 13(c)(5)”. SEC. 3. CONSTRUCTION.

Section 1 shall not be construed as affecting the exemption for apprentices and student learners published in section 570.63 of title 29, Code of Federal Regulations.

On motion of Mr. BALLENGER, said Senate amendment was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby said Senate amendment was agreed to was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk notify the Senate thereof.

194.23 PROVIDING FOR THE

CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 2823 Mr. GOSS, by direction of the Committee on Rules, reported (Rept. No. 104-708) the resolution (H. Res. 489) providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 2823) to amend the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 to support the International Dolphin Conservation Program in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, and for other purposes.

When said resolution and report were referred to the House Calendar and ordered printed. 194.24 LABOR SAFETY STANDARDS FOR

MINORS On motion of Mr. BALLENGER, by unanimous consent, the bill (H.R. 1114) to authorize minors who are under the child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and who are under 18 years of age to load materials into balers and compacters that meet appropriate American National Standards Institute design safety standards; together with the following amendment of the Senate thereto, was taken from the Speaker's table:

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert: SECTION 1. AUTHORITY FOR 16- AND 17-YEAR

OLDS TO LOAD MATERIALS INTO
SCRAP PAPER BALERS AND PAPER

BOX COMPACTORS. Section 13(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 213(c)) is amended by adding to the end thereof the following new paragraph:

“(5)(A) In the administration and enforcement of the child labor provisions of this Act, employees who are 16 and 17 years of age shall be permitted to load materials

“(II) the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors meet an applicable standard that is adopted by the American National Standards Institute after the date of enactment of this paragraph and that is certified by the Secretary to be at least as protective of the safety of minors as the standard described in subclause (I);

“(ii) the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors include an on-off switch incorporating a key-lock or other system and the control of the system is maintained in the custody of employees who are 18 years of age or older;

“(iii) the on-off switch of the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors is maintained in an off position when the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors are not in operation; and

“(iv) the employer of 16- and 17-year-old employees provides notice, and posts a notice, on the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors stating that,

“(I) the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors meet the applicable standard described in clause (i);

"(II) 16- and 17-year-old employees may only load the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors; and

“(III) any employee under the age of 18 may not operate or unload the scrap paper balers and paper box compactors. The Secretary shall publish in the Federal Register a standard that is adopted by the American National Standards Institute for scrap paper balers or paper box compactors and certified by the Secretary to be protective of the safety of minors under clause (i)(II).

*(C)(i) Employers shall prepare and submit to the Secretary reports

"(I) on any injury to an employee under the age of 18 that requires medical treatment (other than first aid) resulting from the employee's contact with a scrap paper baler or paper box compactor during the loading, operation, or unloading of the baler or compactor; and

**(II) on any fatality of an employee under the age of 18 resulting from the employee's contact with a scrap paper baler or paper box compactor during the loading operation, or unloading of the baler or compactor.

“(ii) The reports described in clause (i) shall be used by the Secretary to determine whether or not the implementation of subparagraph (A) has had any effect on the safety of children.

“(iii) The reports described in clause (i) shall provide

“(I) the name, telephone number, and address of the employer and the address of the place of employment where the incident occurred:

“(II) the name, telephone number, and address of the employee who suffered an injury or death as a result of the incident;

“(III) the date of the incident;

“(IV) a description of the injury and a narrative describing how the incident occurred; and

194.25 WORDS TAKEN DOWN

Mr. KANJORSKI during one minute speeches addressed the House and, during the course of his remarks,

Mr. SOLOMON demanded that certain words be taken down.

The Clerk read the words taken down as follows:

I was aware of what you were going to say today. You know full well the reason you came down here on the floor and said what you said is that you didn't have the nerve to go up in the Press Galley and make those charges because you would be subject to a lawsuit.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. HOBSON, held the words taken down to be unparliamentary, and said:

"In the opinion of the Chair, the remarks question the integrity of the gentleman from Pennsylvania [Mr. CLINGER] and constitute a personality in debate.”.

By unanimous consent, the unparliamentary words were stricken from the Record.

On motion of Mr. ARMEY, Mr. KANJORSKI was allowed to proceed in order.

194.26 ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED

Mr. THOMAS, from the Committee on House Oversight, reported that that committee has examined and found truly enrolled bills of the House of the following titles, which were thereupon signed by the Speaker:

H.R. 1627. An Act to amend the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rondenticide Act A motion to

to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said joint resolution was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said joint resolution.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof. the rules were suspended and said bill was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk notify the Senate thereof.

196.11 NATIONAL FILM PRESERVATION

Mr. MOORHEAD moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 1734) to reauthorize the National Film Preservation Board, and for other purposes; as amended.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. MOORHEAD and Mr. SCOTT, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill, as amended?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said bill, as amended, was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill, as amended, was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill.

196.13 JENNINGS RANDOLPH LAKE

PROJECT Mr. GEKAS moved to suspend the rules and pass the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 113) granting the consent of Congress to the compact to provide for joint natural resource management and enforcement of laws and regulations pertaining to natural resources and boating at the Jennings Randolph Lake Project lying in Garrett County, Maryland, and Mineral County, West Virginia, entered into between the States of West Virginia and Maryland.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. GEKAS and Mr. SCOTT, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said joint resolution?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said joint resolution was passed.

On motion of Mr. GEKAS, by unanimous consent, the Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from further consideration of the joint resolution of the Senate (S.J. Res. 20) granting the consent of Congress to the compact to provide for joint natural resource management and enforcement of laws and regulations pertaining to natural resources and boating at the Jennings Randolph Lake Project lying in Garrett County, Maryland, and Mineral County, West Virginia, entered into between the States of West Virginia and Maryland.

The joint resolution was ordered to be read a third time, was read a third time by title, and passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby said joint resolution was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk notify the Senate thereof.

By unanimous consent, H.J. Res. 113, a similar House joint resolution, was laid on the table.

196.15 PUEBLO OF ISLETA INDIAN LANDS

CLAIMS Mr. SMITH of Texas moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 740) to confer jurisdiction of the United States Court of Federal Claims with respect to land claims of Pueblo of Isleta Indian Tribe.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. SMITH of Texas and Mr. SCOTT, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said bill was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill. 196.16 WAR CRIMES

Mr. SMITH of Texas moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 3680) to amend title 18, United States Code, to carry out the international obligations of the United States under the Geneva Conventions to provide criminal penalties for certain war crimes.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. SMITH of Texas and Mr. SCOTT, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said bill was passed

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill.

196.12 LOBBYING DISCLOSURE TECHNICAL

AMENDMENTS Mr. HOKE moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 3435) to make technical amendments to the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995; as amended.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. HOKE and Mr. SCOTT, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill, as amended?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof. the rules were suspended and said bill, as amended, was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill, as amended, was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill.

196.14 MUTUAL AID AGREEMENT

Mr. GEKAS moved to suspend the rules and pass the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 166) granting the consent of Congress to the Mutual Aid Agreement between the city of Bristol, Virginia, and the city of Bristol, Tennessee. The SPEAKER pro tempore,

Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. GEKAS and Mr. SCOTT, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said joint resolution?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said joint resolution was passed.

196.17 MAURITANIAN SLAVERY

Mr. BEREUTER moved to suspend the rules and agree to the following concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 142); as amended:

Whereas the Government of Mauritania has perpetrated a prolonged campaign of ed, was agreed to was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said concurrent resolution.

196.18 MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

A message in writing from the President of the United States was communicated to the House by Mr. Edwin Thomas, one of his secretaries.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill, as amended?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said bill, as amended, was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill, as amended, was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill.

human rights abuses and discrimination against its indigenous black population;

Whereas the Department of State and numerous human rights organizations have documented such abuses;

Whereas chattel slavery, with an estimated tens of thousands of black Mauritanians considered property of their masters and performing unpaid labor, persists despite its legal abolition in 1980:

Whereas individuals attempting to escape from their owners in Mauritania may be subjected to severe punishment and torture;

Whereas the right to a fair trial in Mauritania continues to be restricted due to executive branch pressure on the judiciary;

Whereas policies designed to favor a particular culture and language have marginalized black Mauritanians in the areas of education and employment particularly;

Whereas Mauritanians are deprived of their constitutional right to a a democratically elected government;

Whereas Mauritanian authorities have still refused to investigate or punish individuals responsible for the massacre of over 500 military and civilian black Mauritanians in 1990 and 1991; and

Whereas significant numbers of black Mauritanians remain refugees stripped of their citizenship and property, including tens of thousands of black Mauritanians who were expelled or fled Mauritania during 1989 and 1990: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That the Congress

(1) calls upon the Government of Mauritania to honor its obligations under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, to prosecute slave owners to the fullest extent of the country's anti-slavery law, and to educate individuals being held as slaves on their legal rights;

(2) strongly urges the Government of Mauritania to abolish discriminatory practices and foster an environment that will integrate black Mauritanians into the economic and social mainstream;

(3) urges in the strongest terms that the Government of Mauritania fully investigate and prosecute those officials responsible for the extrajudicial killings and mass expulsions of black Mauritanians during the late 1980s and early 1990s;

(4) calls upon the Government of Mauritania to continue to allow all refugees to return to Mauritania and to restore their full rights;

(5) welcomes Mauritania's recent invitation to international human rights organizations to visit Mauritania; and

(6) further welcomes the growth of an independent press in Mauritania.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. BEREUTER and Mr. UNDERWOOD, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and agree to said concurrent resolution, as amended?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said concurrent resolution, as amended, was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said concurrent resolution, as amend

196.19 AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

AUTHORIZATION Mr. BEREUTER moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 3735) to amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to reauthorize the Development Fund for Africa under chapter 10 of part I of that Act.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. BEREUTER and Mr. ENGEL, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said bill was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill.

196.20 MICROENTERPRISE ASSISTANCE

Mr. BEREUTER moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 3846) to amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to authorize the provision of assistance for microenterprises, and for other purposes.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. BEREUTER and Mr. ENGEL, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and pass said bill?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said bill was passed.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said bill was passed was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill. 196.21 AID SEVERANCE PAY

Mr. BEREUTER moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 3870) to authorize the Agency for International Development to offer voluntary separation incentive payments to employees of that agency, as amended.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. BEREUTER and Mr. ENGEL, each for 20 minutes.

196.22 HONOR FILIPINO VETERANS

Mr. BEREUTER moved to suspend the rules and agree to the following concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 191):

Whereas the Commonwealth of the Philippines was strategically located and thus vital to the defense of the United States during World War II;

Whereas the military forces of the Commonwealth of the Philippines were called into the United States Armed Forces during World War II by Executive order and were put under the command of General Douglas MacArthur;

Whereas the participation of the military forces of the Commonwealth of the Philippines in the battles of Bataan and Corregidor and in other smaller skirmishes delayed and disrupted the initial Japanese effort to conquer the Western Pacific;

Whereas that delay and disruption allowed the United States the vital time to prepare the forces which were needed to drive the Japanese from the Western Pacific and to defeat Japan;

Whereas after the recovery of the Philippine Islands from Japan, the United States was able to use the strategically located Commonwealth of the Philippines as a base from which to launch the final efforts to defeat Japan;

Whereas every American deserves to know the important contribution that the military forces of the Commonwealth of the Philippines made to the outcome of World War II; and

Whereas the Filipino World War II veterans deserve recognition and honor for their important contribution to the outcome of World War II: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representative (the Senate concurring), That the Congress recognizes and honors the Filipino World War II veterans for their defense of democratic ideals and their important contribution to the outcome of World War II.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. BEREUTER and Mr. ENGEL, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and agree to said concurrent resolution?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof, the rules were suspended and said concurrent resolution was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said concurrent resolution was agreed to was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said concurrent resolution.

196.25 BILLS PRESENTED TO THE

PRESIDENT Mr. THOMAS, from the Committee on House Oversight, reported that that committee did on the following dates present to the President, for his approval, bills of the House of the following titles:

On July 25, 1996: H.R. 2337. An Act to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide for increased taxpayer protections.

On July 26, 1996: H.R. 1114. An Act to authorize minors who are under the child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and who are under 18 years of age to load materials into balers and compactors that meet appropriate American National Standards Institute design safety standards.

And then,

196.26 ADJOURNMENT

On motion of Mr. JONES, at 3 o'clock and 54 minutes p.m., the House adjourned.

196.23 KOSOVAN RIGHTS

Mr. BEREUTER moved to suspend the rules and agree to the following concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 155); as amended:

Whereas the Constitution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, adopted in 1946 and the amended Yugoslav Constitution adopted in 1974, described the status of Kosova as one of the 8 constituent territorial units of the Yugoslav Federation;

Whereas the political rights of the Albanian majority in Kosova were curtailed when the Government of Yugoslavia illegally amended the Yugoslav federal constitution without the consent of the people of Kosova on March 23, 1989, revoking Kosova's autonomous status;

Whereas in 1990, the Parliament and Government of Kosova were abolished by further unlawful amendments to the Constitution of Yugoslavia;

Whereas in September 1990, a referendum on the question of independence for Kosova was held in which 87 percent of those eligible to participate voted and 99 percent of those voting supported independence for Kosova;

Whereas in May 1992, a Kosovar national parliament and President, Dr. Ibrahim Rugova, were freely and fairly elected, but were not permitted to assemble in Kosova;

Whereas according to the State Department Country Reports on Human Rights for 1995, "police repression continued at a high level against the ethnic Albanians of Kosova ... and reflected a general campaign to keep [those] who are not ethnic Serbs intimidated and unable to exercise basic human and civil rights'',

Whereas over 100,000 ethnic Albanians employed in the public sector have been removed from their jobs and replaced by Serbs since 1989;

Whereas the government in Belgrade has severely restricted the access of ethnic Albanians in Kosova to all levels of education, especially in the Albanian language;

Whereas the Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe observers dispatched to Kosova in 1991 were expelled by the government in Belgrade in July 1993, and have not been reinstated as called for in United Nations Security Council Resolution 855 of August 1993:

Whereas following the departure of such observers, international human rights organizations have documented an increase in abuses;

Whereas the United Nations announced on February 27, 1995, that Serbia had granted it permission to open a Belgrade office to monitor human rights in Serbia and Kosova;

Whereas Congress directed the State Department to establish a United States Information Agency (U.S.I.A.) cultural center in Prishtina, Kosova, in section 223 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993;

Whereas Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced on February 27, 1996, that Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic has agreed to the establishment of such center and that preparations for the establishment of the center are proceeding;

Whereas, with the signing of the Dayton agreement on Bosnia, future peace in the Balkans hinges largely on a settlement of the status of Kosova; and

Whereas the President has explicitly warned the Government of Serbia that the

United States is prepared to respond in the event of escalated conflict in Kosova caused by Serbia: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that,

(1) the situation in Kosova must be resolved before the outer wall of sanctions against Serbia is lifted and Serbia is able to return to the international community;

(2) the human rights of the people of Kosova must be restored to levels guaranteed by international law;

(3) the United States should support the legitimate claims of the people of Kosova to determine their own political future;

(4) international observers should be returned to Kosova as soon as possible;

(5) the elected government of Kosova should be permitted to meet and exercise its legitimate mandate as elected representatives of the people of Kosova;

(6) all individuals whose employment was terminated on the basis of their ethnicity should be reinstated to their previous positions;

(7) the education system in Kosova should be reopened to all residents of Kosova regardless of ethnicity and the majority ethnic Albanian population should be allowed to educate its youth in its native tongue;

(8) the establishment of a United States Information Agency cultural center in Prishtina, Kosova, is to be commended; and

(9) the President should appoint a special envoy to aid in negotiating a resolution to the crisis in Kosova.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, recognized Mr. BEREUTER and Mr. ENGEL, each for 20 minutes.

After debate,
The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House suspend the rules and agree to said concurrent resolution, as amended?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, announced that two-thirds of the Members present had voted in the affirmative.

So, two-thirds of the Members present having voted in favor thereof. the rules were suspended and said concurrent resolution, as amended, was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby the rules were suspended and said concurrent resolution, as amended, was agreed to was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said concurrent resolution.

196.27 REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON

PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS Under clause 2 of rule XIII, reports of committees were delivered to the Clerk for printing and reference to the proper calendar, as follows:

Mr. GILMAN: Committee on International Relations. H.R. 3846. A bill to amend the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to authorize the provision of assistance for microenterprises, and for other purposes (Rept. No. 104–715). Referred to the Committee of the whole House on the State of the Union.

Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 2292. A bill to preserve and protect the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, and for other purposes; with an amendment (Rept. No. 104–716). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union.

Mr. YOUNG of Alaska: Committee on Resources. H.R. 3487. A bill to reauthorize the National Marine Sanctuaries Act, and for other purposes; with an amendment (Rept. No. 104–717). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union.

Mr. ARCHER: Committee on Ways and Means. H.R. 3815. A bill to make technical corrections and miscellaneous amendments to trade laws; with an amendment (Rept. No. 104–718). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union.

196.24 MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. CALVERT, laid before the House a message from the President, which was read as follows: To the Congress of the United States:

Pursuant to the requirements of 42 U.S.C. 3536. I transmit herewith the 30th Annual Report of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, which covers calendar year 1994.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON. THE WHITE HOUSE, July 29, 1996.

By unanimous consent, the message, together with the accompanying papers, was referred to the Committee on Banking and Financial Services.

196.28 TIME LIMITATION OF REFERRED

BILL Pursuant to clause 5 of rule X, the following action was taken by the Speaker:

H.R. 3539. Referral to the Committee on Ways and Means extended for a period ending not later than July 30, 1996. 196.29 PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 1 of rule XXII, private bills and resolutions were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. BURTON of Indiana: H.R. 3913. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Transportation to issue a certificate of documentation with appropriate endorsement for employment in the coastwise trade for the vessel Western Atlantic; to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

H.R. 3914. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Transportation to issue a certificate of S. 1675. An Act to provide for the nationwide tracking of convicted sexual predators, and for other purposes; and

S. 1784. An Act to amend the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other purposes.

one motion to recommit with or without instructions.

When said resolution was considered. After debate,

By unanimous consent, the previous question was ordered on the resolution to its adoption or rejection.

The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House agree to said resolution?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. KINGSTON, announced that the yeas had it.

Mr. MOAKLEY objected to the vote on the ground that a quorum was not present and not voting.

A quorum not being present,

The roll was called under clause 4, rule XV, and the call was taken by electronic device.

Yeas

228 When there appeared

Nays 175

195.6

H.R. 3603. An Act making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes.

The message also announced that the Senate insists upon its amendments to the bill (H.R. 3603) “An Act making appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes," requests a conference with the House on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses thereon, and appoints Mr. COCHRAN, Mr. SPECTER, Mr. BOND, Mr. GORTON, Mr. MCCONNELL, Mr. BURNS, Mr. HATFIELD, Mr. BUMPERS, Mr. HARKIN, Mr. KERREY, Mr. JOHNSTON, Mr. KOHL, and Mr. BYRD to be the conferees on the part of the Senate.

The message also announced that the Senate insists upon its amendments to the bill (H.R. 3448) “An Act to provide tax relief for small businesses, to protect jobs, to create opportunities, to increase the take home pay of workers, to amend the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 relating to the payment of wages to employees who use employer owned vehicles, and to amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to increase the minimum wage rate and to prevent job loss by providing flexibility to employers in complying with minimum wage and overtime requirements under that Act,” requests a conference with the House on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses thereon, and appoints from the Committee on Labor and Human Resources: Mrs. KASSEBAUM, Mr. JEFFORDS, and Mr. KENNEDY; and from the Committee on Finance: Mr. ROTH, Mr. CHAFEE, Mr. GRASSLEY, Mr. HATCH, Mr. SIMPSON, Mr. PRESSLER, Mr. MOYNIHAN, Mr. BAUCUS, Mr. BRADLEY, Mr. PRYOR, and Mr. ROCKEFELLER to be the conferees on the part of the Senate.

The message also announced that the Senate insists upon its amendment to the bill (H.R. 3103) “An Act to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to improve portability and continuity of health insurance coverage in the group and individual markets, to combat waste, fraud, and abuse in health insurance and health care delivery, to promote the use of medical savings accounts, to improve access to long-term care services and coverage, to simplify the administration of health insurance, and for other purposes,” disagreed to by the House, and agrees to the conference asked by the House on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses thereon, and appoints Mr. ROTH, Mrs. KASSEBAUM, Mr. LOTT, Mr. KENNEDY, and Mr. MOYNIHAN to be the conferees on the part of the Senate.

The message also announced that the Senate has passed bills of the following titles in which the concurrence of the House is requested:

S. 1577. An Act to authorize appropriations for the National Historical Publications and Records Commission for fiscal years 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001;

195.5 PROVIDING FOR THE

CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 2391 Ms. GREENE, by direction of the Committee on Rules, called up the following resolution (H. Res. 488):

Resolved, That at any time after the adoption of this resolution the Speaker may, pursuant to clause 1(b) of rule XXIII, declare the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for consideration of the bill (H.R. 2391) to amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to provide compensatory time for all employees. The first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. General debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Economic and Educational Opportunities. After general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule for a period not to exceed two hours. It shall be in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the Committee on Economic and Educational Opportunities now printed in the bill. The committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. Points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute for failure to comply with clause 7 of rule XVI are waived. Before consideration of any other amendment it shall be in order to consider the amendment printed in the report of the Committee on Rules accompanying this resolution, if offered by Representative Goodling of Pennsylvania or his designee. That amendment shall be considered as read, may amend portions of the bill not yet read, shall be debatable for ten minutes equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the House or in the Committee of the Whole. If that amendment is adopted,

adopted, the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute, as amended, shall be considered as the original bill for the purpose of further amendment. No further amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute, as amended, shall be in order except those printed in the portion of the Congressional Record designated for that purpose in clause 6 of rule XXIII. Amendments so printed shall be considered as read. The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may: (1) postpone until a time during further consideration in the Committee of the Whole a request for a recorded vote on any amendment; and (2) reduce to five minutes the minimum time for electronic voting on any postponed question that follows another electronic vote without intervening business, provided that the minimum time for electronic voting on the first in any series of questions shall be fifteen minutes. At the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the Committee shall rise and report the bill to the House with such amendments as may have been adopted. Any Member may demand a separate vote in the House on any amendment adopted in the Committee of the Whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except

Allard Armey Bachus Baker (CA) Ballenger Barr Barrett (NE) Bartlett Barton Bass Bateman Bereuter Bilbray Bilirakis Bliley Blute Boehlert Boehner Bonilla Bono Brewster Brownback Bryant (TN) Bunn Bunning Burr Burton Buyer Callahan Calvert Camp Campbell Canady Castle Chabot Chambliss Chenoweth Christensen Chrysler Clinger Coble Coburn Collins (GA) Combest Cooley Cox Crane Crapo Cremeans Cubin Cunningham Davis Deal DeLay Diaz-Balart Dickey Doolittle Dornan Dreier Duncan Dunn Ehlers Ehrlich English Ensign Everett Fawell Fields (TX)

[Roll No. 367]

YEAS-228
Flanagan
Foley
Fowler
Fox
Franks (CT)
Franks (NJ)
Frelinghuysen
Funderburk
Gallegly
Ganske
Gekas
Geren
Gilchrest
Gillmor
Gilman
Goodlatte
Goodling
Goss
Graham
Greene (UT)
Greenwood
Gunderson
Gutknecht
Hall (TX)
Hancock
Hansen
Hastert
Hastings (WA)
Hayworth
Hefley
Heineman
Herger
Hilleary
Hobson
Hoekstra
Hoke
Horn
Hostettler
Houghton
Hunter
Hyde
Inglis
Istook
Jacobs
Johnson (CT)
Johnson, Sam
Jones
Kasich
Kelly
Kim
Kingston
Klug
Knollenberg
Kolbe
LaHood
Largent
Latham
LaTourette
Lazio
Leach
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (KY)
Lightfoot
Linder
Livingston
LoBiondo
Longley
Lucas

Manzullo
Martini
McCollum
McCrery
McHugh
McInnis
McIntosh
McKeon
Metcalf
Meyers
Mica
Miller (FL)
Molinari
Montgomery
Moorhead
Morella
Myers
Myrick
Neumann
Ney
Norwood
Nussle
Oxley
Packard
Parker
Paxon
Payne (VA)
Peterson (MN)
Petri
Pickett
Pombo
Porter
Portman
Pryce
Radanovich
Ramstad
Regula
Riggs
Roberts
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Roth
Roukema
Royce
Salmon
Sanford
Saxton
Schaefer
Schiff
Sensenbrenner
Shadegg
Shaw
Shays
Shuster
Sisisky
Skeen
Smith (MI)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Smith (WA)
Solomon
Souder
Spence
Stearns
Stenholm
Stockman
Stump

« ZurückWeiter »