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Markey
Martinez
Martini
Mascara
Matsui
McCarthy
McCollum
McHale
McHugh
McInnis
McKeon
McKinney
McNulty
Meehan
Menendez
Mica
Millender-

McDonald
Miller (CA)
Mink
Moakley
Molinari
Mollohan
Moorhead
Moran
Morella
Myrick
Nadler
Neal
Neumann
Ney
Norwood
Nussle
Olver
Orton
Owens
Pallone

Pastor
Paxon
Payne (NJ)
Pelosi
Peterson (MN)
Petri
Pombo
Porter
Portman
Poshard
Pryce
Quinn
Radanovich
Ramstad
Rangel
Reed
Riggs
Rivers
Roemer
Ros-Lehtinen
Rose
Roukema
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Rush
Salmon
Sanders
Saxton
Scarborough
Schumer
Scott
Seastrand
Sensenbrenner
Serrano
Shadegg
Sisisky
Smith (NJ)

Smith (WA)
Souder
Stark
Stearns
Stockman
Stokes
Stupak
Talent
Tate
Tauzin
Thomas
Thurman
Tiahrt
Torkildsen
Torres
Torricelli
Towns
Traficant
Upton
Velazquez
Visclosky
Volkmer
Vucanovich
Walsh
Wamp
Waters
Watt (NC)
Watts (OK)
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
Williams
Wolf
Woolsey
Zeliff
Zimmer

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168.27

Fields (LA)
Fields (TX)
Filner
Flanagan
Foley
Forbes
Ford
Fowler
Fox
Frank (MA)
Franks (CT)
Franks (NJ)
Frelinghuysen
Frisa
Frost
Funderburk
Furse
Gallegly
Ganske
Gejdenson
Gekas
Gibbons
Gilchrest
Gilman
Gonzalez
Goodlatte
Gordon
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Greene (UT)
Greenwood
Gunderson
Gutierrez
Gutknecht
Hall (OH)
Hamilton
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Hayworth
Hefner
Hilliard
Hinchey
Hobson
Horn
Houghton
Hoyer
Hyde
Jackson (IL)
Jefferson
Johnson (SD)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnston
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kasich
Kelly
Kennedy (MA)
Kennedy (RI)
Kennelly
Kildee
Kim
Kingston
Kleczka
Klink
Knollenberg
Kolbe
La Falce
LaHood
Lantos

Baker (CA) Ballenger Barcia Barrett (NE) Bartlett Barton Bilbray Bilirakis Bonior Bryant (TN) Bunning Burton Buyer Canady Chenoweth Christensen Coburn Collins (GA) Collins (MI) Combest Condit Cooley Costello Cox Crane Crapo Cubin Cunningham Danner Deal DeFazio Diaz-Balart Dickey Doolittle Duncan Dunn Ewing Farr Fazio Foglietta Geren Gillmor Goodling

Archer
Armey
Baker (LA)
Ballenger
Barr
Barrett (WI)
Barton
Bateman
Beilenson
Bereuter
Berman
Bevill
Bishop
Boehlert
Bonilla
Boucher
Brewster
Bryant (TX)
Bunn
Bunning
Burr
Burton
Callahan
Campbell
Castle
Chambliss
Chapman
Chrysler
Clement
Clinger
Clyburn
Coleman
Combest
Cramer
Crane
Deal
DeLay
Dellums
Dicks
Doggett
Edwards
Ehlers
Emerson
Everett
Ewing
Fields (TX)
Frost
Gallegly
Gekas
Geren
Gibbons

Laughlin
Lazio
Leach
Levin
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (GA)
Lightfoot
Linder
Livingston
LoBiondo
Lofgren
Longley
Lowey
Lucas
Luther
Maloney
Manton
Manzullo
Markey
Martini
Mascara
Matsui
McCarthy
McCollum
McCrery
McDermott
McHale
McHugh
McIntosh
McKinney
McNulty
Meehan
Meek
Menendez
Meyers
Mica
Millender-

McDonald
Miller (FL)
Minge
Mink
Moakley
Molinari
Mollohan
Moran
Morella
Murtha
Myrick
Nadler
Neal
Nethercutt
Ney
Norwood
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Oxley
Packard
Pallone
Pastor
Payne (VA)
Pelosi
Peterson (FL)
Petri
Pickett
Pomeroy
Portman
Pryce
Rahall

[Roll No. 218]

AYES—127
Hall (TX)
Hancock
Hansen
Hastert
Hastings (WA)
Hayes
Hefley
Heineman
Herger
Hilleary
Hoekstra
Hoke
Holden
Hostettler
Hunter
Hutchinson
Inglis
Istook
Jacobs
Johnson (CT)
Johnson, Sam
Jones
King
Klug
Largent
Latham
LaTourette
Lewis (KY)
Lipinski
Martinez
McInnis
McKeon
Metcalf
Miller (CA)
Montgomery
Moorhead
Myers
Neumann
Nussle
Orton
Owens
Parker
Paxon

NOES—153
Gillmor
Gonzalez
Goodling
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Gunderson
Hamilton
Hancock
Hansen
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Hastings (WA)
Heineman
Herger
Hostettler
Houghton
Hyde
Istook
Jackson (IL)
Johnson (SD)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnson, Sam
Kasich
King
Knollenberg
Kolbe
Latham
Laughlin
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (KY)
Lightfoot
Linder
Livingston
Longley
Lucas
Manzullo
McCrery
McDermott
Meek
Meyers
Miller (FL)
Minge
Montgomery
Murtha
Myers
Nethercutt
Oberstar
Obey
Ortiz
Oxley

Rangel
Reed
Regula
Richardson
Riggs
Rivers
Roemer
Rogers
Rose
Roukema
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Rush
Sabo
Sanders
Sanford
Sawyer
Saxton
Scarborough
Schroeder
Schumer
Scott
Sensenbrenner
Serrano
Shaw
Sisisky
Skaggs
Skeen
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (MI)
Smith (TX)
Souder
Spence
Spratt
Stark
Stearns
Stokes
Stupak
Talent
Tauzin
Taylor (NC)
Tejeda
Thomas
Thompson
Thornberry
Thurman
Torkildsen
Towns
Upton
Velazquez
Vento
Visclosky
Volkmer
Walsh
Ward
Waters
Watt (NC)
Waxman
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
White
Whitfield
Wicker
Williams
Wise
Woolsey
Wynn
Young (AK)

Payne (NJ)
Peterson (MN)
Pombo
Porter
Poshard
Quillen
Quinn
Radanovich
Ramstad
Roberts
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Roth
Salmon
Schaefer
Seastrand
Shadegg
Shays
Shuster
Smith (NJ)
Smith (WA)
Solomon
Stenholm
Stockman
Stump
Tanner
Tate
Taylor (MS)
Tiahrt
Torres
Torricelli
Traficant
Vucanovich
Walker
Wamp
Watts (OK)
Wilson
Wolf
Young (FL)
Zeliff
Zimmer

Packard
Parker
Payne (VA)
Peterson (FL)
Pickett
Pomeroy
Quillen
Rahall
Regula
Richardson
Roberts
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Roth
Sabo
Sanford
Sawyer
Schaefer
Schroeder
Shaw
Shays
Shuster
Skagg's
Skeen
Skelton
Slaughter
Smith (MI)
Smith (TX)
Solomon
Spence
Spratt
Stenholm
Stump
Tanner
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Tejeda
Thompson
Thornberry
Vento
Walker
Ward
Waxman
White
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson
Wise
Wynn
Young (AK)
Young (FL)

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168.28 PROVIDING FOR THE

CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 3562 Mr. SOLOMON, by direction of the Committee on Rules, reported (Rept. No. 104-604) the resolution (H. Res. 446) providing for the consideration of the bill (H.R. 3562) to authorize the State of Wisconsin to implement the demonstration project known as “Wis

So the amendment was agreed to.

posed to eliminate the "family aggregation” restrictions on pensions for family members, so that spouses or children who work in the same or related businesses can earn their own retirement benefits.

Our 1993 economic plan made 90 percent of small businesses eligible for tax relief. It established a targeted tax preference for capital gains, reduced the record-keeping requirements for the meals and entertainment deduction, and raised the small business expensing limit for equipment by 75 percent, to $17,500. We have proposed to increase further the value of equipment that can be directly expensed to $25,000.

My Administration is also taking steps to ensure that tax regulations are as simple and understandable as possible. For example, administrative guidance has been published to provide tax relief to s corporations and partnerships, simplify depreciation computations, and ease inventory capitalization for small businesses.

We are pursuing tax form simplification through our Simplified Tax and Wage Reporting System (STAWRS). This joint effort among Federal and State agencies will simplify, unify, and streamline tax reporting so that taxpayers will eventually be able to file their State and Federal tax and wage returns at one location, electronically. All these efforts will bring tax reporting into the modern age while reducing the paperwork burden for small business. Shrinking the Regulatory and Paperwork

Burden Regulation and paperwork continue to be a key concern of America's small business owners, and I am proud of the progress my Administration has made in addressing this concern. For example, the SBA is streamlining all its regulations and converting them to plain English. An application form for the most common SBA loans used to be an inch thick and take 5 to 6 weeks to approve. We've reduced the form to one page and cut turn-around time to 3 days.

I've said it before: the era of big Government is over. We have been working hard to give the American people a Government that works better and costs less. We are eliminating 16,000 pages of unnecessary regulations and streamlining 31,000 more-shifting decision-making out of Washington and back to States and local communities. In addition, we are directing Federal agencies, where possible, to cut by half the frequency of reports the public is required to provide to the Government.

More broadly, much of our National Performance Review effort to reinvent Government has been pointed specifically at helping small business. The U.S. Business Advisor, which provides Internet access to information from all Federal agencies, and the U.S. General Store for Small Business, which offers business owners one location for dealing with the Federal government, illustrate our commitment to reinventing

how Government serves the small business community.

In March 1995, I announced a new approach to lessening the regulatory burden on small firms. Under this commonsense approach, small businesses can now avoid paying penalties for violations if they correct the problem within an appropriate period of time. And for those violations that may take longer to correct, a small business may get up to 100 percent of its fine waived

that same money is used to correc the violation.

I'm proud to have succeeded in putting more teeth in the

teeth in the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA). Under the 1980 Act, Federal Government agencies must analyze their proposed regulations for their effects on small firms, and revise them if they will create an unfair burden. In the past, however, because the agencies analyses could not be reviewed in the courts, small businesses had no meaningful recourse if an agency made a poor decision. On March 29, I signed into law the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, which allows for judicial review of Federal agency RFA analyses. The Act also emphasizes compliance assistance and requires agencies to provide small businesses with simple and clear guidelines to assist them in complying with the regulations that affect them.

As small business owners have told us, they care about environmental protection and occupational safety; after all, they drink the same water, breathe the same air, and share the same workplace hazards as everyone else. My Administration has challenged small businesses and regulatory agencies to find cheaper, more efficient ways than government regulation to meet the high environmental and workplace standards Americans want.

Opening Markets and Expanding Trade Every year the Federal Government spends $200 billion on goods and services, and small businesses receive a substantial share of that market. I am committed to expanding further the opportunities for small businesses to win Federal contracts. I found for the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act of 1996, which have simplified the procurement process and made it easier for small firms to do business with the Federal Government.

The 1994 law also created a new Government-wide electronic commerce system, FACNET, which will eventually permit electronic submission of bids and proposals. I encourage small businesses to take advantage of these new procurement procedures to provide more goods and services to the Government.

In addition to the Federal marketplace, foreign markets offer significant opportunities for small business owners to compete and win. While the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) are opening markets abroad, my Administration's National Export Strategy has

made it easier here at home for small businesses to export. Among other things, we've opened 14 U.S. Export Assistance Centers to provide one-stop access to export information, marketing assistance, and finance.

Technology and Innovation Technological innovation by small firms is a major reason for America's leadership in the world economy. Through the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs, the Federal Government taps into the brain power of small businesses to meet its own research needs. In the process, these programs help spur technological innovation to foster new businesses and jobs.

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program alone has nearly doubled awards to small businesses during my Administration-up from $508 million in 1992 to more than $900 million in 1995. And the quality of SBIR research proposals has kept pace with the program's expansion.

We've also dramatically expanded the Manufacturing Extension Partnership to help America's 380,000 smaller manufacturers become more competitive in world markets. Sixty locally managed manufacturing extension centers-up from seven in 1993—are delivering much-needed services to this important small business sector.

As this report documents, changes are coming at lightning speed. Small business owners recognize that they will need all the technological skill and “connectivity” they can muster just to keep up. Through manufacturing extension centers, FACNET, the U.S. Business Advisor, and other information networks, we can help make available the information small businesses need to start up and succeed.

The Human Factor If the heart of our entrepreneurial economy is small business, then the heart of small business is its peoplesmall business owners and their employees. We need to work with small businesses to strengthen and support this dynamic human resource.

We've seen what business growth can do for communities, and we hope to encourage more business formation in empowerment zones and enterprise communities: legislation before the Congress would provide more tax incentives and waivers of some regulatory requirements in these areas. SBA's one-stop capital shops specifically target empowerment zones and enterprise communities.

As I mentioned earlier, we're taking steps to modify the tax code in ways that will make it easier for small businesses to offer health care and retirement plans to their employees. We also want to make sure that workers and their families can keep their health insurance even when they change jobs. I have urged the Congress to enact the Kassebaum-Kennedy bill, which would make health insurance coverage more “portable” for our Nation's workers.

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We want to make better use of our work force training dollars by consolidating and streamlining many of our Federal work force training programs. Under our proposal, States and localities would have more flexibility to administer these programs in the way that will do the most good for our workers and small business owners.

I'm pleased that young entrepreneurs were represented at the White House Conference on Small Business and that the conference looked to our economic future by endorsing more mentorships and workplace educational opportunities for young people. These privatesector-led efforts form an essential part of the work-based learning program I envisioned when I signed into law the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994.

It takes a great deal of courage to start something new, to carve a reality out of a dream, often with few resources, sometimes in adverse surroundings, and in an economy that demands much of its participants. That is why we celebrate and listen to America's small business owners and why we will continue to look for ways to nurture and support this powerful economic engine—the small business sector.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON. THE WHITE HOUSE, June 5, 1996.

By unanimous consent, the message, together with the accompanying papers, was referred to the Committee on Small Business.

rather than by paragraph. Each title shall be considered as read. Points of order against provisions in the bill for failure to comply with clause 2, 5(b), or 6 of rule XXI are waived except as follows: beginning with ". Provided on page 9, line 12, through “Appropriations” on line 18; and beginning with ". Providedon page 13, line 20, through "relocation” on page 14, line 5. Where points of order are waived against part of a paragraph, points of order against a provision in another part of such paragraph may be made only against such provision and not against the entire paragraph. During consideration of the bill for amendment, the Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may accord priority in recognition on the basis of whether the Member offering an amendment has caused it to be printed in the portion of the Congressional Record designated for that purpose in clause 6 of rule XXIII. Amendments so printed shall be considered as read. The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may postpone until a time during further consideration in the Committee of the Whole a request for a recorded vote on any amendment. The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may reduce to not less than five minutes the time for voting by electronic device on any postponed question that immediately follows another vote by electronic device without intervening business, provided that the time for voting by electronic device on the first in any series of questions shall be not less than fifteen minutes. After the reading of the final lines of the bill, a motion that the Committee of the Whole rise and report the bill to the House with such amendments as may have been adopted shall, if offered by the majority leader or a designee, have precedence over a motion to amend. At the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the Committee shall rise and report the bill to the House with such amendments as may have been adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions.

When said resolution was considered. After debate,

By unanimous consent, the previous question was ordered on the resolution to its adoption or rejection and under the operation thereof, the resolution was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby said resolution was agreed to was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

168.7 COMMITTEES AND SUBCOMMITTEES

TO SIT On motion of Mr. UPTON, by unanimous consent, the following committees and their subcommittees were granted permission to sit today during the 5-minute rule: the Committee on Agriculture, the Committee on Banking and Financial Services, the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Resources, and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Abercrombie
Ackerman
Andrews
Baesler
Baker (CA)
Baldacci
Ballenger
Barcia
Barr
Barrett (NE)
Barrett (WI)
Bartlett
Barton
Bass
Bateman
Becerra
Bevill
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Blumenauer
Blute
Boehlert
Boehner
Bonior
Bono
Borski
Boucher
Brewster
Brown (CA)
Brown (OH)
Brownback
Bryant (TN)
Bunning
Burr
Burton
Buyer
Calvert
Camp
Campbell
Canady
Cardin
Castle
Chabot
Chambliss
Chenoweth
Christensen
Chrysler
Clay
Clement
Coble
Coburn
Coleman
Collins (GA)
Collins (IL)
Collins (MI)
Combest
Condit
Conyers
Cooley
Costello
Cox
Cramer
Crane
Cremeans
Cubin
Cummings
Cunningham
Danner
Davis
Deal
DeFazio
Dellums
Deutsch
Diaz-Balart
Dickey
Dingell
Dixon
Doggett
Doolittle
Dornan
Doyle
Dreier
Duncan
Dunn
Durbin
Edwards
Ehlers

AYES—334
Ehrlich
Emerson
English
Ensign
Eshoo
Evans
Everett
Ewing
Farr
Fattah
Fawell
Fields (LA)
Flanagan
Foglietta
Foley
Ford
Fowler
Fox
Frank (MA)
Franks (CT)
Franks (NJ)
Frisa
Frost
Funderburk
Furse
Gephardt
Gilchrest
Gillmor
Gonzalez
Goodlatte
Goodling
Gordon
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Greenwood
Gunderson
Gutierrez
Gutknecht
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hamilton
Hancock
Hansen
Hastert
Hayworth
Hefley
Hefner
Heineman
Herger
Hilleary
Hinchey
Hobson
Hoekstra
Hoke
Holden
Horn
Hostettler
Hoyer
Hunter
Hutchinson
Inglis
Istook
Jackson (IL)
Jacobs
Jefferson
Johnson (SD)
Johnson, E. B.
Jones
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kasich
Kelly
Kennedy (RI)
Kildee
Kim
Kingston
Kleczka
Klink
Klug
Kolbe
LaHood
Lantos
Largent
Latham
LaTourette
Leach

Levin
Lewis (GA)
Linder
Lipinski
LoBiondo
Longley
Lowey
Lucas
Luther
Maloney
Manton
Manzullo
Markey
Martinez
Martini
Mascara
McCarthy
McCollum
McCrery
McDade
McHale
McHugh
McKeon
McKinney
McNulty
Meehan
Meyers
Mica
Millender-

McDonald
Miller (CA)
Minge
Mink
Moakley
Molinari
Mollohan
Montgomery
Moorhead
Myrick
Nadler
Neal
Neumann
Ney
Norwood
Nussle
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Orton
Owens
Oxley
Pallone
Parker
Pastor
Paxon
Payne (VA)
Pelosi
Petri
Pickett
Pombo
Pomeroy
Porter
Portman
Poshard
Pryce
Quillen
Quinn
Radanovich
Rahall
Ramstad
Rangel
Reed
Regula
Riggs
Rivers
Roberts
Roemer
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Rose
Roukema
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Rush
Sabo

168.8 PROVIDING FOR THE

CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 3540 Mr. GOSS, by direction of the Committee on Rules, called up the following resolution (H. Res. 445):

Resolved, That at any time after the adoption of this resolution the Speaker may, pursuant to clause 1(b) of rule XXIII, declare the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for consideration of the bill (H.R. 3540) making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes. The first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. Points of order against consideration of the bill for failure to comply with clause 1(b) of rule X or clause 7 of rule XXI are waived. General debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations. After general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. The bill shall be considered by title

168.9 FOREIGN OPERATIONS

APPROPRIATIONS The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. HEFLEY, pursuant to House Resolution 445 and rule XXIII, declared the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill (H.R. 3540) making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related progams for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes.

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. HEFLEY, by unanimous consent, designated Mr. HANSEN as Chairman of the Committee of the Whole; and after some time spent therein,

168.10 RECORDED VOTE

A recorded vote by electronic device was ordered in the Committee of the

Volkmer
Watt (NC)

Wynn
Waters
Waxman

Yates
NOT VOTING-12
Allard

Jackson-Lee Payne (VA) Cunningham

(TX)

Schiff
Fattah
Lincoln

Williams
Gephardt

Markey
Hayes

Mollohan
So the resolution was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider the vote whereby said resolution was agreed to was, by unanimous consent, laid on the table.

of this resolution shall be considered as adopted. The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, and on any further amendment thereto final passage without intervening motion except: (1) one hour of debate on the bill, as amended, which shall be equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on Ways and Means or their respective designees; (2) one motion to amend by Representative Kleczka of Wisconsin or his designee, which shall be considered as read and shall be separately debatable for one hour equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent; and (3) one motion to recommit with or without instructions.

SEC. 2. The amendment to the bill considered as adopted pursuant to the first section of this resolution is as follows:

In section 1(d) of the bill, strike "subsection (b)(2) exceeds the amount described in subsection (b)(1)” and insert in lieu thereof “subsection (b)(1) exceeds the amount described in subsection (b)(2)”.

When said resolution was considered. After debate,

On motion of Mr. SOLOMON, the previous question was ordered on the resolution to its adoption or rejection.

The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House agree to said resolution?

The SPEAKER pro tempore, Mr. INGLIS, announced that the yeas had it.

Mr. MOAKLEY objected to the vote on the ground that a quorum was not present and not voting.

A quorum not being present,

The roll was called under clause 4, rule XV, and the call was taken by electronic device.

Yeas When there appeared

.... 363 Nays

59

Gallegly
Ganske
Gejdenson
Gekas
Geren
Gilchrest
Gillmor
Gilman
Goodlatte
Goodling
Gordon
Goss
Graham
Green (TX)
Greene (UT)
Greenwood
Gunderson
Gutknecht
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hamilton
Hancock
Hansen
Harman
Hastert
Hastings (FL)
Hastings (WA)
Hayworth
Hefley
Hefner
Heineman
Herger
Hilleary
Hinchey
Hobson
Hoekstra
Hoke
Holden
Horn
Hostettler
Houghton
Hunter
Hutchinson
Hyde
Inglis
Istook
Jacobs
Jefferson
Johnson (CT)
Johnson (SD)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnson, Sam
Johnston
Jones
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kasich
Kelly
Kennedy (MA)
Kennedy (RI)
Kennelly
Kildee
Kim
King
Kingston
Kleczka
Klink
Klug
Knollenberg
Kolbe
La Falce
LaHood
Lantos
Largent
Latham
LaTourette
Laughlin
Lazio
Leach

Levin
Lewis (CA)
Lewis (KY)
Lightfoot
Linder
Lipinski
Livingston
LoBiondo
Lofgren
Longley
Lowey
Lucas
Luther
Maloney
Manton
Manzullo
Martinez
Martini
Mascara
McCarthy
McCollum
McCrery
McDade
McHugh
McInnis
McIntosh
McKeon
McKinney
McNulty
Meehan
Menendez
Metcalf
Meyers
Mica
Miller (CA)
Miller (FL)
Minge
Moakley
Molinari
Montgomery
Moorhead
Moran
Morella
Murtha
Myers
Myrick
Neal
Nethercutt
Neumann
Ney
Norwood
Nussle
Oberstar
Obey
Ortiz
Orton
Oxley.
Packard
Pallone
Parker
Paxon
Peterson (FL)
Peterson (MN)
Petri
Pickett
Pombo
Pomeroy
Porter
Portman
Poshard
Pryce
Quillen
Quinn
Radanovich
Rahall
Ramstad
Reed
Regula
Richardson

Riggs
Rivers
Roberts
Roemer
Rogers
Rohrabacher
Ros-Lehtinen
Rose
Roth
Roukema
Royce
Rush
Salmon
Sanders
Sanford
Saxton
Scarborough
Schaefer
Schroeder
Schumer
Scott
Seastrand
Sensenbrenner
Shadegg
Shaw
Shays
Shuster
Sisisky
Skeen
Skelton
Smith (MI)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Smith (WA)
Solomon
Souder
Spence
Spratt
Stearns
Stenholm
Stockman
Studds
Stump
Stupak
Talent
Tate
Tauzin
Taylor (MS)
Taylor (NC)
Tejeda
Thomas
Thornberry
Thornton
Thurman
Tiahrt
Torkildsen
Torricelli
Traficant
Upton
Vucanovich
Walker
Walsh
Wamp
Ward
Watts (OK)
Weldon (FL)
Weldon (PA)
Weller
White
Whitfield
Wicker
Wilson
Wise
Wolf
Woolsey
Young (AK)
Young (FL)
Zeliff
Zimmer

169.7 ORDER OF BUSINESS

CONSIDERATION OF AMENDMENTS

H.R. 3450 On motion of Mr. CALLAHAN, by unanimous consent,

Ordered, That it may be in order during the further consideration of the bill (H.R. 3450) making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997, and for other purposes, in the Committee of the Whole, pursuant to House Resolution 445, no amendments to the bill shall be in order except the following amendments, if offered by the Member specified or a designee: (1) amendments numbered 54, 58 and 76, by Mr. Obey; (2) amendment numbered 10, by Mr. Frank of Massachusetts; (3) amendment numbered 69, by Mr. Souder; and (4) amendment numbered 75, by Mr. Zimmer; and

Ordered further, That debate on each amendment and all amendments thereto be limited to twenty minutes, equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, except that amendments numbered 54 and 10 shall each be debatable for not to exceed 45 minutes, and consideration of these amendments proceed without intervening motion except one motion to rise if offered by Mr. Callahan.

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169.6

as

Ackerman Archer Armey Bachus Baesler Baker (CA) Baker (LA) Baldacci Ballenger Barcia Barr Barrett (NE) Barrett (WI) Bartlett Barton Bass Bateman Beilenson Bentsen Bereuter Berman Bevill Bilbray Bilirakis Bishop Bliley Blumenauer Blute Boehlert Boehner Bonilla Bonior Bono Borski Boucher Brewster Browder Brown (CA) Brown (FL) Brown (OH) Brownback Bryant (TN)

[Roll No. 219]

YEAS-363
Bunn
Bunning
Burr
Burton
Buyer
Callahan
Calvert
Camp
Campbell
Canady
Castle
Chabot
Chambliss
Chenoweth
Christensen
Chrysler
Clement
Clinger
Coble
Coburn
Coleman
Collins (GA)
Combest
Condit
Cooley
Costello
Cox
Coyne
Cramer
Crane
Crapo
Cremeans
Cubin
Danner
Davis
de la Garza
Deal
DeFazio
DeLauro
DeLay
Deutsch
Diaz-Balart

Dickey Dicks Dingell Dixon Doggett Dooley Doolittle Dornan Doyle Dreier Duncan Dunn Durbin Edwards Ehlers Ehrlich Emerson Engel English Ensign Eshoo Evans Everett Ewing Farr Fawell Fazio Fields (TX) Flake Flanagan Foglietta Foley Forbes Ford Fowler Fox Franks (CT) Franks (NJ) Frelinghuysen Frisa Frost Funderburk

169.8 "WISCONSIN WORKS"

Mr. ARCHER, pursuant to House Resolution 446, called up the bill (H.R. 3562) to authorize the State of Wisconsin to implement the demonstration project known “Wisconsin Works''.

When said bill was considered and read twice.

Pursuant to section 2 of House Resolution 446, the following amendment was considered agreed to:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. AUTHORITY TO IMPLEMENT WIS

CONSIN WORKS DEMONSTRATION

PROJECT. (a) IN GENERAL.–Upon presentation by the State of Wisconsin of the document entitled "Wisconsin Works” (as signed into State law by the Governor of Wisconsin on April 26, 1996) to the appropriate Federal official with respect to any Federal entitlement program specified in such document

(1) such official is deemed to have waived compliance with the requirements of Federal law with respect to such program to the extent and for the period necessary to enable the State of Wisconsin to carry out the demonstration project described in the document; and

(2) the costs of carrying out the demonstration project which would not other

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wise be included as expenditures under such program shall be regarded as expenditures under such program.

b) LIMITATION OF COSTS.-Subsection (a)(2) shall not apply to the extent that

(1) the sum of such costs and the expenditures of the State of Wisconsin under all programs to which subsection (a) applies during any testing period exceeds.

(2) the total amount that would be expended under such programs during such testing period in the absence of the demonstration project.

(c) TESTING PERIOD.-For purposes of subsection (b), the testing periods are

(1) the 5-year period that begins with the date of the commencement of the demonstration project, and

(2) the period of the demonstration project.

(d) RECAPTURE OF EXCESS.—If at the close of any testing period, the Secretary of Health and Human Services determines that the amount described in subsection (b)(1) exceeds the amount described in subsection (b)(2) for such period, such Secretary shall withhold an amount equal to such excess from amounts otherwise payable to the State of Wisconsin under section 403 of the Social Security Act (relating to the program of aid to families with dependent children) for the first fiscal year beginning after the close of such period. The preceding sentence shall not apply to the extent such Secretary is otherwise paid such excess by the State of Wisconsin. SEC. 2. NO EFFECT ON CERTAIN OTHER WAIVERS

GRANTED TO THE STATE OF WIS

CONSIN. This Act shall not be construed to affect the terms or conditions of any waiver granted before the date of the enactment of this Act to the State of Wisconsin under section 1115 of the Social Security Act, including earned waiver savings and conditions. The current waivers are considered a precondition and can be subsumed as part of the Wisconsin Works demonstration. SEC. 3. AUTHORITY TO PARTICIPATE UNDER SUB

SEQUENT LEGISLATION. If, after the date of the enactment of this Act, any Federal law is enacted which modifies the terms of, or the amounts of expenditures permitted under, any program to which section 1 applies, the State of Wisconsin may elect to participate in such program as so modified.

After debate,

Mr. KLECZKA, pursuant to House Resolution 446, submitted the following amendment in the nature of a substitute:

Strike all after the enacting clause and insert: SECTION 1. URGING IMPLEMENTATION OF WIS

CONSIN WORKS DEMONSTRATION

PROJECT. Upon presentation by the State of Wisconsin of the document entitled "Wisconsin Works” as signed into state law by the Governor of Wisconsin on April 26, 1996, to the appropriate Federal official with respect to any Federal entitlement program specified in such document, such official is urged to waive compliance with the requirements of Federal law with respect to such program to the extent and for the period necessary to enable the State of Wisconsin to carry out the demonstration described in the document upon meeting these requirements:

(1) Such official shall publish a notice in the Federal Register describing the proposed changes to Federal programs contained in the document scheduled under Wisconsin law to go into effect in October, 1997, and provide for a 30-day comment period to receive public comments from the citizens of Wisconsin and interested parties.

(2) Such official shall provide for expedited consideration of the demonstration project described in the document under the procedures otherwise required by law, except that such official shall complete such consideration not later than July 31, 1996, compatible with the State schedule established in such document.

(3) Such official shall certify that the plan does in fact contain the features described by the Governor of Wisconsin on page four of the document entitled Wisconsin Works, March 1996 (publication number PES893). SEC. 2. PROVIDING FUNDING AUTHORITY FOR

IMPLEMENTATION. (a) The costs of carrying out the demonstration project which would not otherwise be included as expenditures under such program shall be regarded as expenditures under such program.

(b) LIMITATION OF COSTS.-Subsection (a) shall not apply to the extent that,

(1) the sum of such costs and the expenditures of the State of Wisconsin under all programs to which Section 1 applies during any testing period exceeds

(2) the total amount that would be expended under such programs during such testing period in the absence of the demonstration project.

(c) TESTING PERIOD.–For purposes of subsection (b), the testing periods are

(1) the 5-year period that begins with the date of the commencement of the demonstration project, and

(2) the period of the demonstration project.

(d) RECAPTURE OF EXCESS.-If at the close of any testing period, the Secretary of Health and Human Services determines that the amount described in subsection (b)(1) exceeds the amount in subsection (b)(2) for such period, such Secretary shall withhold an amount equal to such excess from amounts otherwise payable to the State of Wisconsin under section 403 of the Social Security Act (relating to the program of aid to families with dependent children) for the first fiscal year beginning after the close of such period. The preceding sentence shall not apply to the extent such Secretary is otherwise paid such excess by the State of Wisconsin. SEC. 3. NO EFFECT ON CERTAIN OTHER WAIVERS

GRANTED TO THE STATE OF WIS

CONSIN. This Act shall not be construed to affect the terms or conditions of any waiver granted before the date of the enactment of this Act to the State of Wisconsin under section 1115 of the Social Security Act, including earned waiver savings and conditions. The current waivers are considered precondition and can be subsumed as part of the Wisconsin Works demonstration. SEC. 4. AUTHORITY TO PARTICIPATE UNDER SUB

SEQUENT LEGISLATION. If, after the date of enactment of this Act, any Federal law is enacted which modifies the terms of, or the amounts of expenditures permitted under, any program to which section 1 applies, the State of Wisconsin may elect to participate in such program as so modified. SEC. 5. EFFECTIVE DATE.

Sections 2, 3 and 4 of this Act shall become effective on the date that a waiver is approved pursuant to the conditions stated in Section 1.

After some further time,

Pursuant to House Resolution 446 the previous question on the amendment and the bill, as amended, was considered as ordered.

The question being put, viva voce,

Will the House agree to the amendment in the nature of a substitute?

Abercrombie Ackerman Andrews Baesler Baldacci Barcia Barrett (WI) Becerra Beilenson Bentsen Berman Bevill Bishop Blumenauer Bonior Borski Boucher Brewster Browder Brown (CA) Brown (FL) Brown (OH) Bryant (TX) Cardin Chapman Clay Clayton Clement Clyburn Coleman Collins (IL) Collins (MI) Condit Conyers Costello Coyne Cramer Cummings Danner de la Garza DeFazio DeLauro Dellums Deutsch Dicks Dingell Dixon Doggett Dooley Doyle Durbin Edwards Engel Eshoo Evans Farr Fattah Fazio Fields (LA) Filner Flake Foglietta Ford Frank (MA) Frost

Furse
Gejdenson
Gephardt
Geren
Gibbons
Gonzalez
Gordon
Green (TX)
Gutierrez
Hall (OH)
Hall (TX)
Hamilton
Harman
Hastings (FL)
Hefner
Hilliard
Hinchey
Holden
Hoyer
Jackson (IL)
Jacobs
Jefferson
Johnson (SD)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnston
Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kennedy (MA)
Kennedy (RI)
Kennelly
Kildee
Kleczka
Klink
La Falce
Lantos
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lipinski
Lofgren
Lowey
Luther
Maloney
Manton
Markey
Martinez
Mascara
Matsui
McCarthy
McDermott
McHale
McKinney
McNulty
Meehan
Meek
Millender-

McDonald
Miller (CA)
Minge
Mink
Moakley
Montgomery
Moran
Murtha
Nadler
Neal

Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Orton
Owens
Pallone
Pastor
Payne (NJ)
Payne (VA)
Pelosi
Peterson (FL)
Peterson (MN)
Pickett
Pomeroy
Poshard
Rahall
Rangel
Reed
Richardson
Rivers
Roemer
Rose
Roybal-Allard
Rush
Sabo
Sanders
Sawyer
Schroeder
Schumer
Scott
Serrano
Sisisky
Skaggs
Skelton
Slaughter
Spratt
Stark
Stenholm
Stokes
Studds
Stupak
Tanner
Taylor (MS)
Tejeda
Thompson
Thornton
Thurman
Torres
Towns
Traficant
Velazquez
Vento
Visclosky
Volkmer
Ward
Waters
Watt (NC)
Waxman
Williams
Wilson
Wise
Woolsey
Wynn
Yates

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