An analysis of a mineral substance from North America, containing a metal hitherto unknown

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Printed by W. Bulmer, 1802 - 18 Seiten
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Seite 17 - I am much inclined to believe, that the time is perhaps not very distant, when some of the newly-discovered metals, and other substances, which are now considered as simple, primitive, and distinct bodies, will be found to be compounds. Yet I only entertain and state this opinion as a probability; for, until an advanced state of chemical knowledge shall enable us to compose, or at least to decompose, these bodies, each must be classed and denominated as a substance sui generis.
Seite 19 - Hatehett, discovered in 1801, and the tantalic acid discovered by Ekeberg in 1802. Instead, however, of calling the first mentioned acid niobic acid, its original name should have been left to it. The result of Rose's researches was in fact simply the demonstration of the actual difference of columbium and tantalum; for Hatchett's discovery was clear, precise, and well made out, and has never been controverted. This being a correct summary of the history of the composition of the columbium minerals,...
Seite 14 - Prussiate of potash produces a copious and beautiful olivegreen precipitate. 4. Tincture of galls forms orange or deep yellow precipitates. 5. Unlike the other metallic acids, it refuses to unite with ammonia. 6. When mixed and distilled with sulphur, it does not combine with it so as to form a metallic sulphuret. 7. It does not tinge any of the fluxes, except phosphoric acid, with which, even in the' humid way, it appears to have a very great affinity.
Seite 1 - I found that this specimen was only described as " a very heavy black stone, " with golden streaks," which proved to be yellow mica ; and it appeared, that it had been sent, with various specimens of iron ores, to Sir HANS SLOANE, by Mr. WINTHROP, of Massachusets.
Seite 14 - Analysis of produces, when immersed in the acid solutions; and by the colour which it communicates to phosphate of ammonia, or rather to concrete phosphoric acid, when melted with it. Moreover, from the experiments made with the blow-pipe, it seems to be one of those metallic substances which retain oxygen with great obstinacy, and are therefore of difficult reduction. It is an acidifiable metal ; for the oxide reddens litmus paper, expels carbonic acid, and forms combinations with the fixed alkalis.
Seite 13 - ... three-fourths of the whole. This substance is proved to be of a metallic nature, by the coloured precipitates which it forms with prussiate of potash, and with tincture of galls; by the effects which zinc produces, when immersed in the acid solutions ; and by the colour which it communicates to phosphate of ammonia, or rather to concrete phosphoric acid, when melted with it.
Seite 14 - ... phosphate of ammonia, or rather to concrete phosphoric acid, when melted with it. Moreover, from the experiments made with the blow-pipe, it seems to be one of those metallic substances which retain oxygen with great obstinacy, and are therefore of difficult reduction. It is an acidifiable metal ; for the oxide reddens litmus paper, expels carbonic acid, and forms combinations with the fixed alkalis. But it is very different from the acidifiable metals which have of late been discovered ; for,...
Seite 7 - The globule, when cold, is deep blue, with a tinge of purple, but, when held between the eye and the light, it appears of a greenish gray colour.
Seite 19 - ... Bodenmais, he showed that this mineral contained not one but two metallic acids ; one of these was tantalum, and the other he supposed to be a new metal which he named niobium.* Subsequent examination, however, convinced Rose (and his conclusions have been confirmed by others who have repeated his experiments), that the two metallic acids obtained from the Bodenmais columbite were really the original columbic acid of Hatchett, discovered in 1801, and the tantalic acid discovered by Ekeberg in...
Seite 1 - The name of the mine, or place where it was found, is also noted in the catalogue; the writing however is scarcely legible: it appears to be an Indian name, (Nautneauge;) but I am informed by several American gentlemen, that many of the Indian names (by which certain small districts, hills, &c. were forty or fifty years ago distinguished,) are now totally forgotten, and European names have been adopted in the room of them. This may have been the case in the present instance; but, as the other specimens...

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