Petrarch's Remedies for Fortune Fair and Foul: Book I

Cover
Indiana University Press, 1991 - 2368 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Preface in Form of a Letter to Ad Azonem?
1
When happy about or hopeful or desirous
13
Royal Favor
155
A Loyal Friend
164
Fertile Land
171
Elephants and Camels
177
Fishponds
183
A Prominent Marriage
190
Smooth Sailing
234
Power
243
Popularity
249
Kingship and Empire
255
De carceris exitu
263
110
297
Expecting Better Times
310
118
314

De pavonibus
226
A Good Lord
228
Hope for Life Eternal
323
Urheberrecht

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (1991)

Son of an exiled Florentine clerk, Petrarch was born in Arezzo, Italy, but was raised at the court of the Pope in Avignon in southern France. He studied the classics in France and continued his education at the University of Bologna in Italy. Less than a year after his return to Avignon in 1326, Petrarch fell in love with the woman he referred to as Laura in his most famous poetry. Although he never revealed her true name, nor, apparently, ever expressed his love to her directly, he made her immortal with his Canzoniere (date unknown), or songbook, a collection of lyric poems and sonnets that rank among the most beautiful written in Italian, or in any other language. Like the major Italian poet Dante Alighieri, Petrarch chose to write his most intimate feelings in his native Italian, rather than the Latin customary at that time. Petrarch used Latin for his more formal works, however. He incorrectly assumed that he would be remembered for the Latin works, but it was his Italian lyric poetry that influenced both the content and form of all subsequent European poetry. Petrarch's sonnet form was prized by English poets as an alternative to English poet William Shakespeare's sonnet form.

Bibliografische Informationen