The Long Shadow of Temperament

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Harvard University Press, 2009 - 304 Seiten
We have seen these children--the shy and the sociable, the cautious and the daring--and wondered what makes one avoid new experience and another avidly pursue it. At the crux of the issue surrounding the contribution of nature to development is the study that Jerome Kagan and his colleagues have been conducting for more than two decades. In The Long Shadow of Temperament, Kagan and Nancy Snidman summarize the results of this unique inquiry into human temperaments, one of the best-known longitudinal studies in developmental psychology. These results reveal how deeply certain fundamental temperamental biases can be preserved over development. Identifying two extreme temperamental types--inhibited and uninhibited in childhood, and high-reactive and low-reactive in very young babies--Kagan and his colleagues returned to these children as adolescents. Surprisingly, one of the temperaments revealed in infancy predicted a cautious, fearful personality in early childhood and a dour mood in adolescence. The other bias predicted a bold childhood personality and an exuberant, sanguine mood in adolescence. These personalities were matched by different biological properties. In a masterly summary of their wide-ranging exploration, Kagan and Snidman conclude that these two temperaments are the result of inherited biologies probably rooted in the differential excitability of particular brain structures. Though the authors appreciate that temperamental tendencies can be modified by experience, this compelling work--an empirical and conceptual tour-de-force--shows how long the shadow of temperament is cast over psychological development.
 

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Inhalt

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1
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4
III
34
IV
64
V
106
VI
190
VII
217
VIII
246
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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 247 - C (2002). Painful stimuli evoke different stimulusresponse functions in the amygdala, prefrontal, insula and somatosensory cortex: a single-trial fMRI study. Brain 125: 1326-1336.
Seite 277 - Thody, AJ (1995) Variants of the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor gene are associated with red hair and fair skin in humans.
Seite 274 - L., et al. (2002). Identification of a signaling network in lateral nucleus of amygdala important for inhibiting memory specifically related to learned fear.
Seite 277 - W., et al. (2002). Brain circuits involved in emotional learning in antisocial behavior and social phobia in humans. Neuroscience Letters, 328, 233-236.

Über den Autor (2009)

Jerome Kagan is Daniel and Amy Starch Professor of Psychology at Harvard University.

Nancy Snidman is Lecturer in the Department of Psychology and Director of the Infant Laboratory at Harvard.

Bibliografische Informationen