The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science

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Cambridge University Press, 20.12.2007 - 300 Seiten
Peter Harrison provides an account of the religious foundations of scientific knowledge. He shows how the approaches to the study of nature that emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were directly informed by theological discussions about the Fall of Man and the extent to which the mind and the senses had been damaged by that primeval event. Scientific methods, he suggests, were originally devised as techniques for ameliorating the cognitive damage wrought by human sin. At its inception, modern science was conceptualized as a means of recapturing the knowledge of nature that Adam had once possessed. Contrary to a widespread view that sees science emerging in conflict with religion, Harrison argues that theological considerations were of vital importance in the framing of the scientific method.
 

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Adams Encyclopaedia
17
science in paradise
19
carnal knowledge and the divine light
34
anything else but you should have no doubts about these
38
Augustine revived
52
Our theology and that of St Augustine by the grace
55
ofits entire nature and abilities and moreover afarbetter one thanwe
58
depravity and doubt
59
Dethroning the idols
139
selfknowledge and the sciences
141
the dominion of mind
155
the fallen body
162
intellectual idolatry
172
After Adam had lost the righteousness in which God had
175
alchemists and hermeticists who sought to replace decades of labour
185
The instauration of learning
186

augustinus
66
given to the practice of natural philosophy wrote much on
87
Seeking certainty in a fallen world
89
mathematical certainties
103
For Hartcliffe the sciences of his own era represented a
125
knowledge shall be increased
188
natures of things than the scholastic philosophers had ever managed
223
anthropology abandoned
233
only for someone lacking strong commitments to any of the
240
the art of using experiments and of drawing conclusions from
243

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Über den Autor (2007)

Peter Harrison is Professor of History and Philosophy, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Bond University.

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