Temporalising Anthropology: Archaeology in the Talensi Tong Hills, Northern Ghana

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Africa Magna Verlag, 2013 - 270 Seiten
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This volume contains the results of significant fieldwork completed in the Tong Hills of Northern Ghana, an area currently inhabited by the Talensi ethno-linguistic group. Although made anthropologically renowned by the anthropologist Meyer Fortes, the archaeology and material culture of the Talensi Tong Hills had largely been neglected until the research initiated by the authors. Extensive archaeological surveys and excavations were completed allied with ethnoarchaeological and ethnobotanical research on shrines, sacrifice, and indigenous medicine. The data is presented and described, and a settlement chronology for the region reconstructed. The results of the geological, organic geochemical, petrographic, and archaeometallurgical analysis are provided. The function of shrines and the meaning of 'shrine' as a concept are evaluated, and indigenous medicinal practices, their links with shrines, and their substances, materiality, and archaeological implications assessed with reference to the primary empirical material gathered. Ritual, performance, and its inter-relation with the past and the archaeological record are also considered so as to question the 'timelessness' of previous anthropological presentations. The Tong Hills are also discussed with reference to their place in the wider history and archaeology of the region. This book will be useful to anyone interested in the archaeology and anthropology of African indigenous religions and ritual practices, as well as those interested in West African history, and the relationship between archaeology and anthropology.
 

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Inhalt

Foreword and Acknowledgements
11
History
18
The Structure of this Book
24
Discussion
48
THE SURVEY SHRINEs
54
Other Shrines
69
Archaeological Visibility and Comparative Perspectives
77
THE EXCAVATIONS
92
Sacrifice Use and Disposal
180
Conclusions The Implications of Talensi Animal Sacrifice for the Archaeological Record
186
Defining Talensi Medicinal Practices
198
Conclusions Rethinking Medicine and Healing in Archaeological Contexts
208
Ritual Procedures and Archaeological Research
214
CONCLUSIONS TEMPORALISING ANTHROPOLOGY
217
1 by Sharon Fraser Kevin Gibbs
227
1 by Maria Kostoglou
233

THE POTTERY
120
Metal Working Debris
142
LITHIC AND oTHER NoNMETAL SMALL FINDs
149
Grinding and Pounding Stones
157
Clay Ritual Object
164
FAUNAL REMAINs SACRIFICE AND DIvINATIoN
171
1 by Veerle Linseele
239
3 by Sharon Fraser Bart E van Dongen Anu Thompson Timothy lnsoll
247
1 by Elizabeth Cooper
253
References
261
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2013)

Timothy Insoll is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Manchester. Besides his fieldwork in Ghana he has completed archaeological research in Mali, Bahrain, Eritrea, and Western India. He obtained his PhD and was a Research Fellow from St Johns College, University of Cambridge. His research interests focus upon the archaeology of African indigenous religions and Islam, the archaeology of Islam more generally, and theoretical approaches to the archaeology of identities. He is the author and/or editor of eighteen books and special journal issues. He is currently involved in fieldwork in south-western Ethiopia and writing a book for Oxford University Press, Material Explorations in African Archaeology. Rachel MacLean gained her PhD from Cambridge in 1996 and she currently has an Honorary Research Fellowship in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Manchester. She has many years experience of project management and working in Africa, both East and West, and has also completed research in Bahrain. Her previous book is An Archaeological Guide to Bahrain (2011). Her research interests are varied encompassing the archaeology of food, metal working, and survey methodology. Benjamin W. Kankpeyeng is an Associate Professor and the current Head of the Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, University of Ghana. He studied at Syracuse University in the United States of America where he obtained an MA and PhD in Anthropology in 1996 and 2003, respectively. He also holds a BA (Honours) degree in History with Philosophy from the University of Ghana awarded in 1981. He worked at the Ghana Museums and Monuments Board from 1983 until joining the Faculty at the University of Ghana in 2004. His research interests include culture contact studies, archaeology of rituals and religions, public archaeology, and heritage studies. His archaeological research projects are linked with the sites of Kpaliworgu, Tongo-Tengzug (with Timothy Insoll and Rachel MacLean), Koma Land, and slavery. He has eighteen publications.

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