Speedboat

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New York Review of Books, 19.03.2013 - 192 Seiten
Winner of the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award, this is one of the defining books of the 1970s, an experimental novel about a young journalist trying to navigate life in America. 

When Speedboat burst on the scene in the late ’70s it was like nothing readers had encountered before. It seemed to disregard the rules of the novel, but it wore its unconventionality with ease. Reading it was a pleasure of a new, unexpected kind. Above all, there was its voice, ambivalent, curious, wry, the voice of Jen Fain, a journalist negotiating the fraught landscape of contemporary urban America. Party guests, taxi drivers, brownstone dwellers, professors, journalists, presidents, and debutantes fill these dispatches from the world as Jen finds it.
       
A touchstone over the years for writers as different as David Foster Wallace and Elizabeth Hardwick, Speedboat returns to enthrall a new generation of readers.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - RandyMetcalfe - LibraryThing

Observational and uncommitted, the sometimes life of a journalist, Jen, who doesn’t like to ask questions forms the backdrop of this novel of — I was going to say “ideas” but I think “impressions” is ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - flydodofly - LibraryThing

It is not easy to pack a suitcase of a book full of ideas and thoughts, fragments of life, you need to fold and tuck until you have it just right. Renata Adler turned out to be very good at packing ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

CASTLING
7
QUIET
34
BROWNSTONE
52
SPEEDBOAT
69
ISLANDS
90
WHAT WAR
112
THE AGENCY
138
Afterword
173
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2013)

Renata Adler was born in Milan and raised in Connecticut. She received a B.A. from Bryn Mawr, an M.A. from Harvard, a D.d’E.S. from the Sorbonne, a J.D. from Yale Law School, and an LL.D. (honorary) from Georgetown. Adler became a staff writer at The New Yorker in 1963 and, except for a year as the chief film critic of The New York Times, remained at The New Yorker for the next four decades. Her books include A Year in the Dark (1969); Toward a Radical Middle (1970); Reckless Disregard: Westmoreland v. CBS et al., Sharon v. Time (1986); Canaries in the Mineshaft (2001); Gone: The Last Days of The New Yorker (1999); Irreparable Harm: The U.S. Supreme Court and The Decision That Made George W. Bush President (2004); and the novels Speedboat (1976; winner of the Ernest Hemingway Award for Best First Novel) and Pitch Dark (1983).

Guy Trebay reports on culture for The New York Times. He was previously a columnist for The Village Voice and has written for The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Travel and Leisure, Harper’s, Esquire, Grand Street, and other major publications. His work, twice honored with the Meyer Berger Award, presented by the Columbia University School of Journalism, has received numerous other awards, been widely anthologized, and was collected in In The Place to Be: Guy
Trebay’s New York
.

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