Reproducing Women: Medicine, Metaphor, and Childbirth in Late Imperial China

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University of California Press, 11.08.2010 - 378 Seiten
This innovative book uses the lens of cultural history to examine the development of medicine in Qing dynasty China. Focusing on the specialty of "medicine for women"(fuke), Yi-Li Wu explores the material and ideological issues associated with childbearing in the late imperial period. She draws on a rich array of medical writings that circulated in seventeenth- to nineteenth-century China to analyze the points of convergence and contention that shaped people's views of women's reproductive diseases. These points of contention touched on fundamental issues: How different were women's bodies from men's? What drugs were best for promoting conception and preventing miscarriage? Was childbirth inherently dangerous? And who was best qualified to judge? Wu shows that late imperial medicine approached these questions with a new, positive perspective.
 

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Inhalt

Introduction
1
1 Late Imperial Fuke and the Literate Medical Tradition
15
Popular Fuke Manuals in the Qing
54
3 Function and Structure in the Female Body
84
Pregnancy and Miscarriage
120
The Discourse of Cosmologically Resonant Childbirth
147
Strategies for Postpartum Health
188
Body Gender and Medical Legitimacy
224
Notes
237
Glossary
311
Bibliography
319
Index
343
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Über den Autor (2010)

Yi-Li Wu is an independent scholar and a Center Associate of the Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan.

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