Japan's Emergence as a Modern State: Political and Economic Problems of the Meiji Period

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UBC Press, 2000 - 302 Seiten
Originally in 1940, this classic published work by a leading Japanologist examines the problems and accomplishments of the Meiji period (1868-1912), which formed the roots of modern Japan. E. H. Norman reveals how elites maintained their political and economic domination during the period. He writes not simply about the emergence of modern Japan but also about the emergence of modernity itself.

In this anniversary edition, leading American, Canadian, and Japanese scholars have contributed ten short essays reassessing the work and life of E. H. Norman. A new preface and introduction by Lawrence Woods and new forewords by R. Gordon Robertson, Len Edwards, and William L. Holland supplement the original text as well.

 

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Inhalt

I INTRODUCTION
3
II THE BACKGROUND OF THE MEIJI RESTORATION
11
III THE RESTORATION
49
IV EARLY INDUSTRIALIZATION
104
V THE AGRARIAN SETTLEMENT AND ITS SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES
136
VI PARTIES AND POLITICS
167
CONCLUSION
207
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON MEIJI JAPAN
211
EH Norman andJapan
252
4 EH Normans Emergence and the Institute of Pacific Relations
259
5 Emergence in Context
264
Lessons from EH Norman
268
7 Emergence and After
272
8 Emergence as History
276
9 EH Norman and Japans Emergence as a Neomodern State
279
10 The Economics of the Meiji Restoration
283

GLOSSARY
235
EH Normans Emergence Sixty Years On
243
1 Rereading EH Norman
245
Engaged Scholar Civilized Man V
248
CONTRIBUTORS
287
INDEX
291
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2000)

E. Herbert Norman (1909-57) joined the CanadianDepartment of External Affairs after his studies and was posted toJapan in 1940-42. In 1946 he returned as part of the Allied occupationteam. Accused of Communist sympathies and hounded by Joseph McCarthy,he committed suicide while posted as ambassador to Egypt.Lawrence T. Woods (editor) teaches internationalstudies at the University of Northern British Columbia.

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