Human No More: Digital Subjectivities, Unhuman Subjects, and the End of Anthropology

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Neil L. Whitehead, Michael Wesch
University Press of Colorado, 12.08.2012 - 264 Seiten
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Turning an anthropological eye toward cyberspace, Human No More explores how conditions of the online world shape identity, place, culture, and death within virtual communities.

Online worlds have recently thrown into question the traditional anthropological conception of place-based ethnography. They break definitions, blur distinctions, and force us to rethink the notion of the "subject." Human No More asks how digital cultures can be integrated and how the ethnography of both the "unhuman" and the "digital" could lead to possible reconfiguring the notion of the "human."

This provocative and groundbreaking work challenges fundamental assumptions about the entire field of anthropology. Cross-disciplinary research from well-respected contributors makes this volume vital to the understanding of contemporary human interaction. It will be of interest not only to anthropologists but also to students and scholars of media, communication, popular culture, identity, and technology.
 

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Inhalt

Human No More
1
1 The Mutual CoConstruction of Online and Onground in Cyborganic
11
2 We Were Always Human
33
3 Manufacturing and Encountering Human in the Age of Digital Reproduction
49
4 The Digital Graveyard
71
5 Anonymous Anonymity and the Ends of Identity and Groups Online
89
6 Splitting and Layering at the Interface
105
7 Avatar
131
9 The Adventures of Mark and Olly
157
10 Invisible Caboclos and Vagabond Ethnographers
177
11 Marginal Bodies Altered States and Subhumans
199
12 Are We There Yet?
217
Afterword
231
Contributors
235
Index
237
Urheberrecht

8 Technology Representation and the Ethropologist
147

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Über den Autor (2012)

Neil L. Whitehead is a professor of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Michael Wesch is an associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University.

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