Celtic Mythology and Religion

Cover
A. & W. Mackenzie, 1885 - 109 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

I
4
II
6
III
12
IV
14
V
15
VI
17
VII
20
VIII
21
XI
39
XII
41
XIII
51
XIV
59
XV
68
XVI
71
XVII
79
XVIII
93

IX
25
X
29
XIX
97

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 78 - And the house, when it was in building, was built of stone made ready before it was brought thither so that there was neither hammer nor axe nor any tool of iron heard in the house, while it was in building.
Seite 71 - Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow. Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Seite 88 - This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses ; this to thee, preserve thou my sheep ; and so on.' After that, they use the same ceremony to the noxious animals : ' This I give to thee, O fox ! spare thou my lambs ; this to thee, O hooded crow ! this to thee, O eagle...
Seite 46 - Kai had this peculiarity, that his breath lasted nine nights and nine days under water, and he could exist nine nights and nine days without sleep. A wound from Kai's sword no physician could heal. Very subtle was Kai. When it pleased him he could render himself as tall as the highest tree in the forest. And he had another peculiarity, — so great was the heat of his nature, that, when it rained hardest, whatever he carried remained dry for a handbreadth above and a handbreadth below his hand ;...
Seite 79 - The baleful yew, though dead, has oft been seen To rise from earth, and spring with dusky green; With sparkling flames the trees unburning shine, And round their boles prodigious serpents twine. The pious worshippers approach not near, But shun their gods, and kneel with distant fear...
Seite 91 - The mistress and servants of each family take a sheaf of oats and dress it up in women's apparel, put it in a large basket, and lay a wooden club by it, and this they call Briid's Bed : and then the mistress and servants cry three times, Briid is come, Briid is welcome.
Seite 90 - Every family furnished a peck of malt, and this was brewed into ale. One of their number was picked out to wade into the sea up to the middle ; and, carrying a cup of ale in his hand, standing still in that posture...
Seite 87 - Every one, blind-fold, draws out a portion. He who holds the bonnet is entitled to the last bit. Whoever draws the black bit, is the devoted person who is to be sacrificed to Baal, whose favour they mean to implore in rendering the year productive of the sustenance of man and beast. There is little doubt of these inhuman sacrifices having been once offered in this country as well as in the East, although they now omit the act of sacrificing, and only compel the devoted person to leap three times...
Seite 78 - English, determined upon, viz., that the temples of the idols in that nation ought not to be destroyed ; but let the idols that are in them be destroyed ; let holy water be made and sprinkled in the said temples, let altars be erected, and relics placed.
Seite 43 - land under the waves," and not as the sea-god proper ; and, again, the Irish Alloid is distinctly against any such change of letters as Nudd into Llud, besides its being otherwise far from probable that such a change should occur on any principle of alliteration. Lir, under the name of Llud, is, in the histories and tales, the brother of Cassibelaunus, Caesar's opponent, and in his reign Britain was troubled with three direful plagues : the Coranians, a people " whose knowledge was such that there...

Bibliografische Informationen