Barren in the Promised Land: Childless Americans and the Pursuit of Happiness

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Harvard University Press, 1997 - 318 Seiten
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Chronicling astonishing shifts in public attitudes toward reproduction, from the association of barrenness with sin in colonial times, to the creation of laws for compulsory sterilization in the early twentieth century, from the baby craze of the 1950s, to the rise in voluntary childlessness in the 1990s, to the increasing reliance on startling reproductive technologies today, Elaine Tyler May reveals the intersection between public life and the most private part of our lives—sexuality, procreation, and family.

 

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BARREN IN THE PROMISED LAND: Childless Americans and the Pursuit of Happiness

Nutzerbericht  - Kirkus

A superb historical and qualitative analysis that explores the intersection of public and private definitions of fertility and childlessness. May (American Studies/Univ. of Minnesota; Homeward Bound ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - StoutHearted - LibraryThing

In this book, May examines the history and social impact of people who cannot or will not have children. It's the "cannots" who receive the most attention from May, though she does devote one small ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Childlessness Before
21
Eugenics and the Pressure
61
Class Race and Compulsory
95
The Rise of Compulsory Parenthood
127
Freud in the Bedroom Sex at the Clinic
151
The Revolt Against the Baby Boom
181
The Baby Quest and
211
A Note on the Sample of Letters
261
INDEX
307
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (1997)

Elaine Tyler May is Professor of American Studies at the University of Minnesota.

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