Gravitation, Teil 3

Frontcover
Macmillan, 15.09.1973 - 1279 Seiten
17 Rezensionen
This landmark text offers a rigorous full-year graduate level course on gravitation physics, teaching students to:
• Grasp the laws of physics in flat spacetime
• Predict orders of magnitude
• Calculate using the principal tools of modern geometry
• Predict all levels of precision
• Understand Einstein's geometric framework for physics
• Explore applications, including pulsars and neutron stars, cosmology, the Schwarzschild geometry and gravitational collapse, and gravitational waves
• Probe experimental tests of Einstein's theory
• Tackle advanced topics such as superspace and quantum geometrodynamics
 
The book offers a unique, alternating two-track  pathway through the subject:
• In many chapters, material focusing on basic physical ideas is designated as
Track 1. These sections together make an appropriate one-term advanced/graduate level course (mathematical prerequisites: vector analysis and simple partial-differential equations). The book is printed to make it easy for readers to identify these sections.
• The remaining Track 2 material provides a wealth of advanced topics instructors can draw from to flesh out a two-term course, with Track 1 sections serving as prerequisites.
  

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Nutzerbericht  - josh314 - LibraryThing

A friend of mine in college liked to take this book from my shelf and drop it on the floor in a demonstration of gravity. As this is a monstrous tome, it made a fairly satisfying "thwomp" upon impact ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Review: Gravitation

Nutzerbericht  - GR Reader - Goodreads

I read this when I was twelve and made my own models of tensors out of egg boxes. My mother says she still has them up in the loft. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

SPACETIME PHYSICS
1
5
9
PHYSICS IN FLAT SPACETIME
45
Farewell to ict
51
Differentials
63
The Electromagnetic Field
71
Lorentz force law defines fields predicts
72
Tensors in All Generality
74
Mass and Angular Momentum of Fully Relativistic Sources
451
Mass and Angular Momentum of a Closed Universe
457
Conservation Laws for 4Momentum and Angular Momentum
460
Gaussian Flux Integrals for 4Momentum and Angular Momentum
461
Volume Integrals for 4Momentum and Angular Momentum
464
Why the Energy of the Gravitational Field Cannot be Localized
466
Conservation Laws for Total 4Momentum and Angular Momentum
468
Equation of Motion Derived from the Field Equation
471

ThreePlusOne View Versus Geometric View
78
Maxwells Equations
79
Working with Tensors
81
Electromagnetism and Differential Forms
90
Differential forms and exterior calculus
91
Electromagnetic 2Form and Lorentz Force
99
From honeycomb to abstract 2form
102
Forms Illuminate Electromagnetism and Electromagnetism Illuminates Forms
105
Duality of 2forms
108
Radiation Fields 1 10
111
Maxwells Equations
112
Exterior Derivative and Closed Forms 1 14
114
Progression of forms and exterior deriva
115
Distant Action from Local Law
120
1 5
126
StressEnergy Tensor and Conservation Laws 1 30
130
Threedimensional volumes
135
Components of StressEnergy Tensor
137
StressEnergy Tensor for a Swarm of Particles
138
StressEnergy Tensor for a Perfect Fluid
139
Electromagnetic StressEnergy
140
Symmetry of the StressEnergy Tensor
141
Integral Formulation
142
Differential Formulation
146
Volume integrals surface integrals and Gausss
147
Sample Application of V T 0
152
Newtonian hydrodynamics reviewed 1 53
153
Angular Momentum
156
Accelerated Observers
163
Hyperbolic Motion
166
Constraints on Size of an Accelerated Frame
168
The Tetrad Carried by a Uniformly Accelerated Observer
169
The Tetrad FermiWalker Transported by an Observer with Arbitrary Acceleration
170
The Local Coordinate System of an Accelerated Observer 1 72
172
Incompatibility of Gravity and Special Relativity
177
Gravitational Redshift Derived from Energy Conservation
187
Gravitational Redshift as Evidence for the Principle of Equivalence
189
Local Flatness Global Curvature
190
THE MATHEMATICS OF CURVED SPACETIME
193
An Overview 1 95
195
Difference in Outlook and Power
197
Pictorial Abstract Component
198
Tensor Algebra in Curved Spacetime
201
Parallel Transport Covariant Derivative Connection Coefficients Geodesies
207
Mathematical Discussion
217
Geodesic Deviation and the Riemann Curvature Tensor
218
Differential Topology
225
Vector and Directional Derivative Refined into Tangent Vector
226
Bases Components and Transformation Laws for Vectors
230
1Forms
231
Tensors
233
Commutators and Pictorial Techniques
235
Manifolds and Differential Topology
240
Geodesies Parallel Transport and Covariant Derivative
244
Pictorial Approach
245
Abstract Approach
247
terms of Schilds ladder
248
Component Approach
258
Geodesic Equation
262
Geodesic Deviation and Spacetime Curvature
265
Tidal Gravitational Forces and Riemann Curvature Tensor
270
Parallel Transport Around a Closed Curve
277
Flatness is Equivalent to Zero Riemann Curvature
283
Riemann Normal Coordinates
285
Newtonian Gravity in the Language of Curved Spacetime
289
Stratification of Newtonian Spacetime
291
Galilean Coordinate Systems
292
Geometric CoordinateFree Formulation of Newtonian Gravity
298
A Critique
302
Metric as Foundation of All
304
Metric
305
Concord Between Geodesies of Curved Spacetime Geometry and Straight Lines of Local Lorentz Geometry
312
Geodesies as World Lines of Extremal Proper Time
315
MetricInduced Properties of Riemann
324
The Proper Reference Frame of an Accelerated Observer
327
Calculation of Curvature
333
Forming the Einstein Tensor
343
More Efficient Computation
344
Curvature 2Forms
348
Computation of Curvature Using Exterior Differential Forms
354
Bianchi Identities and the Boundary of a Boundary
364
Bianchi Identity ftf 0 as a Manifestation of Boundary of Boundary 0
372
Key to Contracted Bianchi Identity
373
Calculation of the Moment of Rotation
375
Conservation of Moment of Rotation Seen from Boundary of a Boundary is Zero
377
Conservation of Moment of Rotation Expressed in Differential Form
378
A Preview
379
EINSTEINS GEOMETRIC THEORY OF GRAVITY
383
Equivalence Principle and Measurement of the Gravitational Field
385
FactorOrdering Problems in the Equivalence Principle
388
The Rods and Clocks Used to Measure Space and Time Intervals
393
lines
397
The Measurement of the Gravitational Field
399
Automatic Conservation of the Source as the Central Idea in the Formulation of the Field Equation
404
A Dynamic Necessity
408
Cosmological Constant
409
The Newtonian Limit
412
Axiomatize Einsteins Theory?
416
A Feature Distinguishing Einsteins Theory from Other Theories of Gravity
429
A Taste of the History of Einsteins Equation
431
Weak Gravitational Fields 1 I The Linearized Theory of Gravity
435
Gravitational Waves
442
Nearly Newtonian Gravitational Fields
445
Mass and Angular Momentum of a Gravitating System
448
Measurement of the Mass and Angular Momentum
450
Variational Principle and InitialValue Data
484
The Hilbert Action Principle and the Palatini Method of Variation
491
Matter Lagrangian and StressEnergy Tensor
504
Splitting Spacetime into Space and Time
505
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Curvature
509
The Hilbert Action Principle and the ArnowittDeserMisner Modification Thereof in the SpaceplusTime Split
519
The ArnowittDeserMisner Formulation of the Dynamics of Geometry
520
Integrating Forward in Time
526
The InitialValue Problem in the ThinSandwich Formulation
528
The TimeSymmetric and TimeAntisymmetric InitialValue Problem
535
Yorks Handles to Specify a 4Geometry
539
Machs Principle and the Origin of Inertia
543
Junction Conditions
551
4
565
RELATIVISTIC STARS
591
Pulsars and Neutron Stars Quasars and Supermassive Stars
618
The Pit in the Potential as the Central New Feature of Motion
636
try
674
Stellar Pulsations
688
THE UNIVERSE
701
Evolution of the Universe into Its Present State
763
Present State and Future Evolution of the Universe
771
Anisotropic and Inhomogeneous Cosmologies
800
GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE AND BLACK HOLES
817
Gravitational Collapse
842
Black Holes
872
The Gravitational and Electromagnetic Fields of a Black Hole
875
Mass Angular Momentum Charge and Magnetic Moment
891
Symmetries and Frame Dragging
892
Equations of Motion for Test Particles
897
Principal Null Congruences
901
Storage and Removal of Energy from Black Holes
904
Reversible and Irreversible Transformations
907
Global Techniques Horizons and Singularity Theorems
916
Infinity in Asymptotically Flat Spacetime
917
Causality and Horizons
922
Global Structure of Horizons
924
Proof of Second Law of BlackHole Dynamics
931
Singularity Theorems and the Issue of the Final State
934
GRAVITATIONAL WAVES
941
Propagation of Gravitational Waves
943
Review of Linearized Theory in Vacuum
944
PlaneWave Solutions in Linearized Theory
945
The Transverse Traceless TT Gauge
946
Geodesic Deviation in a Linearized Gravitational Wave
950
Polarization of a Plane Wave
952
The StressEnergy Carried by a Gravitational Wave
955
Gravitational Waves in the Full Theory of General Relativity
956
An Exact PlaneWave Solution
957
Physical Properties of the Exact Plane Wave
960
Comparison of an Exact Electromagnetic Plane Wave with the Gravitational Plane Wave
961
A New Viewpoint on the Exact Plane Wave
962
The Shortwave Approximation
964
Effect of Background Curvature on Wave Propagation
967
StressEnergy Tensor for Gravitational Waves
969
Generation of Gravitational Waves
974
Power Radiated in Terms of Internal Power Flow
978
Laboratory Generators of Gravitational Waves
979
General Discussion
980
Gravitational Collapse Black Holes Supernovae and Pulsars as Sources
981
Binary Stars as Sources
986
Formulas for Radiation from Nearly Newtonian SlowMotion Sources
989
Radiation Reaction in SlowMotion Sources
993
Foundations for Derivation of Radiation Formulas
995
Evaluation of the Radiation Field in the SlowMotion Approximation
996
Derivation of the RadiationReaction Potential
1001
Detection of Gravitational Waves
1004
Accelerations in Mechanical Detectors
1006
Types of Mechanical Detectors
1012
EXPERIMENTAL TESTS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY
1045
Other Theories of Gravity and the PostNewtonian Approximation
1066
SolarSystem Experiments
1096
FRONTIERS
1133
Lorentz Transformation via Spinor Algebra 1 142
1142
Thomas Precession via Spinor Algebra 1 145
1145
Spmors
1148
Correspondence Between Vectors and Spinors 1 150
1150
Spinor Algebra
1151
Spin Space and Its Basis Spinors 1 1 56
1156
Spinor Viewed as Flagpole Plus Flag Plus OrientationEntanglement
1157
1 57
1158
An Application of Spinors 1 160
1160
Spinors as a Powerful Tool in Gravitation Theory 1 1 64
1164
Regge Calculus 1 166
1166
Simplexes and Deficit Angles
1167
Skeleton Form of Field Equations
1169
The Choice of Lattice Structure 1 173
1173
tries out of lowerdimensional ones 1 1 76
1176
Past Applications of Regge Calculus 1 1 78
1178
The Future of Regge Calculus 1 1 79
1179
Arena for the Dynamics of Geometry 1 180
1180
The Dynamics of Geometry Described in the Language of the Superspace of the I3s
1184
The EinsteinHamiltonJacobi Equation
1185
Fluctuations in Geometry 1 1 90
1190
Beyond the End of Time
1196
Assessment of the Theory that Predicts Collapse 1 198
1198
Their Prevalence and Final Dominance
1202
Not Geometry but Pregeometry as the Magic Building Material 1 203
1203
Pregeometry as the Calculus of Propositions
1208
The Reprocessing of the Universe
1209
Bibliography and Index of Names
1221
Subject Index
1255
1006
1265
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (1973)

Kip S. Thorne is a theoretical physicist, known for his contributions in gravitation physics and astrophysics and for having trained a generation of scientists. He is considered one of the few authorities on gravitational waves. He was the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at Caltech until 2009, when he resigned to pursue writing and filmmaking.

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