Demonstrations of the divine pefections, as manifested in the material universe (Google eBook)

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1847
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Seite 4 - Ye that in waters glide, and ye that walk The earth, and stately tread, or lowly creep, Witness if I be silent, morn or even, To hill or valley, fountain or fresh shade, Made vocal by my song, and taught His praise. Hail, universal Lord ! be bounteous still To give us only good ; and if the night Have gathered aught of evil, or concealed, Disperse it, as now light dispels the dark.
Seite 78 - ... circulate in vapour through the air and irrigate the land, producing springs and rivers. By them are produced all disturbances of the chemical equilibrium of the elements of nature, which, by a series of compositions and decompositions give rise to new products, and originate a transfer of materials. Even the slow degradation of the solid constituents of the surface, in which its chief geological changes consist...
Seite 118 - ... transported into some adjacent lake, or estuary, or sea. Here they floated on the waters, until they sank saturated to the bottom, and being buried in the detritus of adjacent lands, became transferred to a new estate among the members of the mineral kingdom. A long interment followed, during which a course of chemical changes, and new combinations of their vegetable elements, have converted them into the mineral condition of coal.
Seite 44 - Swallows follow the flies and gnats, and flies and gnats usually delight in warm strata of air ; and as warm air is lighter, and usually moister than cold air, when the warm strata of air are high, there is less chance of moisture being thrown down from them by the mixture with cold air ; but when the warm and moist air is close to the surface, it is almost certain, that, as the cold air flows down into it, a deposition of water will take place.
Seite 103 - The pulsations of the air, once set in motion by the human voice, cease not to exist with the sounds to which they gave rise.
Seite 79 - I have observed generally a coppery or yellow sunset to foretell rain ; but, as an indication of wet weather approaching, nothing is more certain than a halo round the moon, which is produced by the precipitated water ; and the larger the circle the nearer the clouds, and, consequently, the more ready to fall. Hal. I have often observed that the old proverb is correct — A rainbow in the morning is the shepherd's warning ; A rainbow at night is the shepherd's delight.
Seite 8 - When, from external objects, he turns his view upon himself, on his own vital and intellectual faculties, he finds that he possesses a power of examining and analysing his own nature to a certain extent, but no farther. , In his corporeal frame, he is sensible of a power to communicate a certain moderate amount of motion to himself and other objects ; that this power depends on his will, and that its exertion can be suspended or increased at pleasure within certain limits ; but how his will acts...
Seite 63 - ... the aloe. In very intense heats, and when the soil is dry, the life of plants seems to be preserved by the absorbent power of their leaves : and it is a beautiful circumstance in the economy of nature, that aqueous vapour is most abundant in the atmosphere when it is most needed for the purposes of life ; and that when other sources of its supply are cut off, this is most copious.
Seite 60 - ... and hard-seeded vegetables on which they feed. Their chief employment during the autumnal season is foraging to supply their winter stores. In performing this necessary duty they drop abundance of seed in their flight over fields, hedges, and by fences, where they alight to deposit them in the post-holes, etc.
Seite 12 - For instance; these laws require, in order to produce the same effect, that the rays of light, in passing from water into the eye, should be refracted by a more convex surface than when it passes out of air into the eye. Accordingly we find that the eye of a fish, in that part of it called the crystalline lens, is much rounder than the eye of terrestrial animals. What plainer manifestation of design can there be than this difference...

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