Transactions of the American Philosophical Society

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American Philosophical Society, 1966
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Seite 36 - Roy P. Easier (ed.), The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln (New Brunswick, 1953-1955), 4, p.
Seite 82 - ... duties on Indian corn, and Indian meal and flour, potatoes, and beans, should be reduced one-half during the same period. I suppose your attention will have been drawn to this order by the consul of the United States at Havana, and its provisions published for the benefit of our commerce. propositions for a change in the restrictive system of duties upon our commerce with their colonies.
Seite 16 - ... Americans in Cuba to stop. The United States Consul in Havana needed permission to negotiate the settlement of minor incidents directly with the Cuban Captain General rather than refer such questions to Madrid. Finally Marcy ordered Dodge "to negotiate a new commercial treaty" which included Cuban trade.*8 The two most immediate tasks before Dodge — Cuba's purchase and the negotiation of a commercial treaty — were not new goals by any means but they would be difficult to achieve and not because...
Seite 19 - ... southern part of the United States. Such governors as Jose de la Concha and the Marquis of Pezuela did reduce the trade and thus were enemies to the South. The removal of Pezuela, for example, was as much due to specific friction with the United States as it was to reducing the concerns of the South." Soon after the events in Cuba, Spain's diplomatic activity became more complicated due to the American presidential election of 1856 and because of a significant reversion to autocratic government...
Seite 21 - ... flamboyant means than before. Spain continued to employ essentially defensive tactics in protecting her colony, but the intensity of Spanish concern for Cuba never diminished. III. AN ELUSIVE CUBA Buchanan's inauguration as president in March, 1857, signaled the start of a more intensified effort by the government of the United States to acquire Cuba. In summarizing his first speech, La Epoca reflected Spanish determination to retain Cuba by declaring "it will not be bought." Las Novedades warned...
Seite 78 - Seward wanted to prevent the reduction of trade that he anticipated the Civil War would cause by instructing Schurz to pick up negotiations on a commercial treaty begun by the Pierce administration. The secretary believed this was also necessary since Spain would respect the blockade at an expense to her foreign trade. Schurz visited 21 Ibid. 22 John D. Goss, The History of Tariff Administration in the United States (New York, 1968), pp. 56-63; FW Taussig, The Tariff History of the United States...
Seite 19 - The Spanish legation reported the campaign and final outcome in detail and afterwards, Escalante expressed the hope that the influence 54 FW Knight, Slave Society in Cuba during the Nineteenth Century (Madison, 1970), pp. 143-146; Min. of St. to Concha, January 8, 1855, Estado/esclavitud/8047, Archivo Historico Nacional ; New York Times, January 15, 1856, p. 2, April 30, 1856, p. 2 ; Las Novedades, April 8, 1856, p. 1. 55 Knight, Slave Society in Cuba, 52, 92, 140.
Seite 38 - ... of the unwise decision to annex Santo Domingo were harvested.48 Disturbing the United States, he worried about Spain's deteriorating situation in the New World. He dispatched more troops to the island to put down the revolt. In October, the Spanish government declared a blockade around the colony.49 Gustave Koerner, Schurz's replacement in Madrid, criticized Spanish officials for accusing the United States of unneutral behavior, reporting that the French were also charging Washington with fomenting...
Seite 43 - I can imagine," writes Mr. Buchanan, "no possible remedy for these evils but for the government of the United States to assume a temporary protectorate over the northern portions of Chihuahua and Sonora, and to establish military posts within the same. This protection might be withdrawn as soon as local governments shall be established in these Mexican states, capable of performing their duties towards...
Seite 33 - ... argument that Washington could not be allowed to take Santo Domingo if Madrid wanted to protect Cuba. O'Donnell thought this too rash a move and ordered Serrano to stall for time by providing Santo Domingo with cash and supplies. He further instructed him not to annex the republic without orders.18 In the fall O'Donnell's government began to rethink its policies now that it hopefully had time to do so. There were many reasons for annexation that could be considered. Providing a protectorate,...

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