Nowhere in Africa: An Autobiographical Novel

Frontcover
Terrace Books, 10.03.2004 - 291 Seiten
13 Rezensionen
Nowhere in Africa is the extraordinary tale of a Jewish family who flees the Nazi regime in 1938 for a remote farm in Kenya. Abandoning their once-comfortable existence in Germany, Walter Redlich, his wife Jettel, and their five-year-old daughter, Regina, each deal with the harsh realities of their new life in different ways. Attorney Walter is resigned to working the farm as a caretaker; pampered Jettel resists adjustment at every turn; while the shy yet curious Regina immediately embraces the country—learning the local language and customs, and finding a friend in Owuor, the farm's cook. As the war rages on the other side of the world, the family’s relationships with their strange environment become increasingly complicated as Jettel grows more self-assured and Walter more haunted by the life they left behind. In 1946, with the war over, Regina's fondest dream comes true when her brother Max is born. Walter's decision, however, to return to his homeland to help rebuild a new Germany puts his family into turmoil again.

Visit the Web site for the film at www.nowhereinafrica.com
  

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Review: Nowhere in Africa: An Autobiographical Novel

Nutzerbericht  - Emily Thevenin - Goodreads

I actually only got about a third of the way through it. It wasn't bad, just way too slow paced for me. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Review: Nowhere in Africa: An Autobiographical Novel

Nutzerbericht  - John Benson - Goodreads

In this fictional autobiography of the author's childhood in Kenya during World War II, she brings out the story of her German Jewish family who fled the Nazis in the late 1930s and settled to farm in ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

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Über den Autor (2004)

Stefanie Zweig was born in Leobschutz, Upper Silesia, in 1932. In 1938 she and her parents fled to Kenya, as a result of the Nazi persecution of Jews. Her father, a lawyer and notary public, worked as a manager on a farm and earned just enough to finance his daughter's schooling. The family spent most of its time in Ol’ Joro Orok, situated directly at the Equator—3,000 meters above sea level—a very remote place, even for Africa. In 1944 Stefanie Zweig's father enlisted in the British Army, which also enabled him and his family to return to Germany in 1947. Upon their return, they were shocked to see so much destruction, hunger, and despair. Stefanie, who could not read or write German, had problems adjusting to this alien world. However, after graduating from high school she worked as a journalist for a Jewish newspaper. In 1963 she became the chief editor of the culture section of the Abendpost-Nachtausgabe in Frankfurt. She has been working as a freelance journalist and author since 1988. She has written numerous youth books and novels, which have won many awards and prizes in Europe, and her autobiographical novels Nirgendwo in Afrika and Irgendwo in Deutschland have become bestsellers.

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