The Duchess of Malfi

Frontcover
Courier Corporation, 1623 - 92 Seiten
13 Rezensionen
The evils of greed and ambition overwhelm love, innocence, and the bonds of kinship in this dark tragedy concerning the secret marriage of a noblewoman and a commoner. John Webster’s great Jacobean drama detailing the fiendish schemes of two brothers who desire their wealthy sister’s title and estates ends with a bloody and horrifying climax. A dynamic plot brimming with poetic lyricism, this provocative and profoundly original work will appeal to general readers, students, and teachers of drama and literature.
  

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Review: The Duchess of Malfi

Nutzerbericht  - Bruce - Goodreads

This play, the work of John Webster, a master of Jacobean tragedy, was first produced in London in 1614. Act I: Although there are characters here who are dangerous – Bosola, the Cardinal, Ferdinand ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Review: The Duchess of Malfi

Nutzerbericht  - Andrew - Goodreads

John Webster's most celebrated play reads well; I've never read his work before, nor seen it performed live on stage or on film. I imagine myself a Jacobean theatre-goer seeing & hearing this farrago ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

ACT I
1
ACT II
17
ACT III
33
ACT IV
55
ACT V
71
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (1623)

Webster seems to have participated in many dramatic collaborations, but his undisputed work consists of only three plays: The White Devil (1612), The Duchess of Malfi (1614), and The Devil's Law Case (1623). His two great tragedies, The White Devil and The Duchess of Malfi, are darkly poetic and brooding, especially in their sardonic villain-spokesmen, Flamineo and Bosola. As critic Robert Dent has shown, Webster plundered other authors for his laborious, jewel-like, sententious, and epigrammatic style, but the overall effect is one of a soaring and passionate poetry. Webster employs the full gamut of violent and sensational effects, especially in The Duchess of Malfi, to render a physical sense of horror. His plots are drawn from the political and amorous intrigues of Renaissance Italy.

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