Copyright, Communication and Culture: Towards a Relational Theory of Copyright Law

Frontcover
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011 - 272 Seiten
0 Rezensionen
In this provocative book, Carys Craig challenges the assumptions of possessive individualism embedded in modern day copyright law, arguing that the dominant conception of copyright as private property fails to adequately reflect the realities of cultural creativity. Employing both theoretical argument and doctrinal analysis, including the novel use of feminist theory, the author explores how the assumptions of modern copyright result in law that frequently restricts the kinds of expressive activities it ought to encourage. In contrast, Carys Craig proposes a relational theory of copyright based on a dialogic account of authorship, and guided by the public interest in a vibrant, participatory culture. Through a critical examination of the doctrines of originality and fair dealing, as well as the relationship between copyright and freedom of expression, she explores how this relational theory of copyright law could further the public purposes of the copyright system and the social values it embodies. This unique and insightful study will be of great interest to students and scholars of intellectual property, communications, cultural studies, feminist theory and the arts and humanities.
  

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

1 Introduction
1
PART I Copyright and cultural creativity in context
9
The underlying philosophy of the copyright model
11
Feminist theory and the relational author
31
Locke labour and limiting the authors right
65
4 Against a Lockean approach to copyright
67
The authors right and the public interest
103
exploring the limits of copyright
153
6 Fair dealing and the purposes of copyright protection
155
7 Dissolving the conflict between copyright and freedom of expression
203
8 Final conclusions
243
Index
253
Urheberrecht

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Bibliografische Informationen