Austria, Germany, and the Cold War: From the Anschluss to the State Treaty 1938-1955

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Berghahn Books, 2008 - History - 172 pages
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In the 'Moscow Declaration' of 1943 the Allies officially propagated the notion of Austria as the first victim of Hitlerite aggression and announced their intention to set up a "free and independent Austria" after the war, which finally happened in 1955. By questioning why it took so long to get to this point, the author addresses issues such as the victim thesis, Austrians as perpetrators, Austrian anti-Semitism and official attempts to mitigate its effects after the war. He discusses the various proposals for post-war Austria and connects for the first time the issues of Anschluss, German question, Cold War, and the State Treaty. He makes it clear that the question of Austria was from the very beginning inextricably linked with the more important question of Germany.

  

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Contents

German troops march into Innsbruck
9
Hitler addresses the masses at Viennas Heldenplatz
11
Jews are now undesired
13
The Moscow Declaration
28
The Future of Austria
34
Thoughts about Austria Notes by Frank Roberts and Oliver Harvey
40
Zones of Occupation
45
U S soldiers at the Brenner border
46
The legendary Four in a Jeep
86
Comments by Anthony Eden and William Strang
98
Telegram by Andreas Rotter to Foreign Minister Leopold Figl
114
Comments by Anthony Eden 123124
124
Julius Raabs thoughts about his visit to Moscow
125
The signing of the State Treaty
132
Lowering of the U S flag
134
Conclusion
139

Road to Vienna hazardous
47
U S troops moving into Vienna
50
Members of the Allied Council
51
Demonstration for the return of South Tyrol
59
and Germany
69
OVP Protest
84
Summit meeting in Geneva
141
Chronology
145
Archives
151
Index
161
Copyright

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