Mother Courage and Her Children

Frontcover
Arcade Publishing, 1996 - 93 Seiten
15 Rezensionen
Widely considered one of the great dramatic creations of the modern stage, Mother Courage and Her Children is Bertolt Brecht's most passionate and profound statement against war. Set in the seventeenth century, the play follows Anna Fierling--'Mother Courage'--an itinerant trader, as she pulls her wagon of wares and her children through the blood and carnage of Europe's religious wars.

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Review: Mother Courage and Her Children

Nutzerbericht  - Hadeel AlDegheishem - Goodreads

Brave Elif, honest Swiss Cheese, and sacrificing Katrin all died at the end of the play. Morals do not live under war circumstances. During war, you people need to be selfish so stay alive! So ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Review: Mother Courage and Her Children

Nutzerbericht  - J. Slowik - Goodreads

First: "He thought so little of this earth He cursed the hour of his birth." I'm going to keep seeing this sentiment, aren't I? Earlier today I cited an almost identical line from Strindberg's Miss ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

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Über den Autor (1996)

Critics have said that Eric Bentley has given a new direction to theatrical history and represents the German avant-garde in drama. Brecht's most ambitious venture in verse drama, Saint Joan of the Stockyards (1933), was written in Germany shortly before Hitler came to power. Brecht left his homeland in 1993. Before he came to the United States in 1941, he was one of the editors of a short-lived anti-Nazi magazine in Moscow (1936--39). In 1949 his play Mother Courage and Her Children, which was a Marxist indictment of the economic motives behind internal aggression, was produced in the United States. Brecht found a large audience as librettist for Kurt Weill's Threepenny Opera, an adaptation of John Gay's Beggar's Opera. Brecht is considered a playwright who saw the stage as a platform for the presentation of a message. His aim was to transform the state from a place of entertainment to a place for instruction and public communication. He called himself an epic realist. In 1947, Brecht was summoned to Washington, D.C., by the on Un-American Activities Committee, before which he testified. He firmly denied that he had ever been a member of the Communist Party. How radical Brecht really was has been the subject of considerable controversy; but, for literary purposes, his politics need only be judged as they contributed to his artistry. In his final years Brecht experimented with his own theater and company-the Berliner Ensemble-which put on his plays under his direction and which continued after his death with the assistance of his wife. Brecht aspired to create political theater, and it is difficult to evaluate his work in purely aesthetic terms. It is likely that the demise of Marxist governments will influence his reputation over the next decade, though the changes are difficult to predict. Brecht died in 1956.

The son of Clifford and Agnes Gilmour Hare, David Hare was born on June 5, 1947, in St. Leonards, England. After graduating from Jesus College in Cambridge in 1968 with the honors Master of Arts degree in English, Hare went to work for the film company A.B. Pathe. Soon after, Hare co-founded the Portable Theatre Company, a touring experimental theatre group. While serving as the theatre's director from 1968 to 1971, Hare wrote his first plays. In 1970, Hare won the Evening Standard Drama Award for most promising new playwright for Slag, his first major play. Two years later, after Portable Theatre declared bankruptcy, Hare became resident dramatist at Nottingham Playhouse. Hare also co-founded the Joint Stock Theatre Group and served as its director from 1975 to 1980. During these years Hare produced many more plays, including The Great Exhibition, Brassneck, and Knuckle, the first of Hare's plays to be produced in London's West End. In addition to directing his own plays, Hare has directed such works as The Party by Trevor Griffiths, Devil's Island by Tony Bicat, and King Lear, with Anthony Hopkins in the title role. In 1982, Hare opened his own film company, Greenpoint Films. Among the screenplays written by Hare are Plenty, Paris by Night, and Wetherby, a story about repressed passions among members of the middle class.

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