The Cambridge History of Early Inner Asia, Volume 1

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Denis Sinor
Cambridge University Press, Mar 1, 1990 - History - 518 pages
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Originally announced as Volume I of The Cambridge History of Central Asia, this book will now be published as a one volume history. (Volumes 2 and 3, previously announced, will not now be published.) This book introduces the geographical setting of Inner Asia and follows its history from the paleolithic era to the rise of the Mongol empire in the thirteenth century. From earliest times Inner Asia has linked and separated the great sedentary civilizations of Europe and Asia. In the pre-modern period it was definable more as a cultural than a geographical entity, its frontiers shifting accORD international scholars who have pioneered the exploration of Inner Asia's poorly documented past, this book chronologically traces the varying historical achievements of the disparate population groups in the region. These include the Scythians and Sarmatians, the Hsiung-nu, the Huns and Avars, the people of the Russian steppes, the Turk empire, the Uighurs and the Tibetan empire. It is the editor's hope that this book will bring Inner Asia more closely into the fabric of world history.
  

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Contents

the concept of Inner Asia
1
The geographic setting
19
The natural zones of Inner Asia
27
Steppe zones
33
Inner Asia at the dawn of history
41
The Scythians and Sarmatians
97
The Sarmatians
107
The Hsiungnu
118
The Oghuz Torki in the south Russian steppes 175
275
The establishment and dissolution of the Turk empire 185
285
Turks and the Juanjuan
291
The founding of the first Turk kaghanate 197
297
The partition of the Turk state
305
Epilogue
313
Ethnic composition territorial extent and administration
320
Religion
329

The Hsiungnu and their nonChinese neighbors
125
The struggle for the Western Regions
131
From split to submission
138
The Northern Hsiungnu
144
IndoEuropeans in Inner Asia
151
The Hun period
177
The Avars 106
206
The peoples and languages of the Avar state 111
221
The peoples of the Russian forest belt
229
The origins and development of the Hungarians 141
242
Extinct peoples of the Middle Volga region 148
248
The peoples of the south Russian steppes 156
256
The Khazars 163
263
Social change
335
The Karakhanids and early Islam
343
The Samanids and Islam in Central Asia
352
Early and medieval Tibet
371
The period of the regency
379
The decline and disintegration of the empire
385
The dark period 8501000 and the second introduction
391
Decline of the Saskya power and the rule of Phagmogru
397
The Jurchens
411
Bibliography
424
Index
495
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Page 491 - Ancient historical edicts at Lhasa and the Mu Tsung/Khri Gtsug Lde Brtsan treaty of AD 821822 from the inscription at Lhasa.

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